Webinar “Leading For the Future”

 

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Many leaders wonder how to prepare for an uncertain future – one that is filled with complexity, changing expectations and an increasing global awareness about ethical responsibility.

On October 13, 2015 I will be presenting a webinar for CUPA-HR (College and University Professional Association For Human Resources) that explores strategies for helping leaders and organizations prepare. Below is a description of the Webinar and a link for registering to attend. 

“Leading For the Future: Responding to Increasing Ethical Expectations”

Expectations for responsible leadership are increasing, and any ethical mistakes can be highly visible on social media. University administrators and faculty members must adapt to this new high-visibility environment, and HR can help through leadership development programs and by having an understanding of what it takes to sustain an ethical culture. 

During this webinar, you’ll hear about trends in ethical leadership and gain an awareness of the level of ethical leadership that is expected in a global society. You’ll get an introduction to the 7 Lenses® model — a kaleidoscopic view of ethical leadership described in Linda Fisher Thornton’s book 7 Lenses. You will learn about ethical culture as a human performance system aligned around positive ethical values. You’ll also walk away with practical strategies for building a proactive ethical culture and helping your institution’s leaders stay ahead of increasing ethical expectations.

Presenter: Linda Fisher Thornton

Chief Executive Officer, Leading in Context LLC and

Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Richmond SPCS

I hope you’ll join me to learn more about how to prepare for the future of leadership. You can register for the free webinar at this link: CUPA-HR Leading For The Future Webcast.

 

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What is “Good Food” (In an Ethical Sense)?

20140927_160727By Linda Fisher Thornton

What is “Good” Food?

I was reading an article that ranked food products, and I began to think about how many different variables define “good” or “best” when we’re talking about food products. One variable is how good the food tastes. But there are many more. Shoppers may consider variables that include:

  • flavor
  • appearance
  • convenience
  • number of servings
  • packaging
  • cost

That list is missing something, though. What about all of the decisions that happen before the food gets to the store that also impact the consumer? Many of those decisions determine whether or not the end product contributes to our overall health. 

“Good Food” Supports Health and Well Being

There are many ethical dimensions of food products. We don’t see them – they may not be advertised, and are decided well before the product reaches us. They are determined by big and small decisions made by others, including business leaders. And they impact our health and well-being.

Consumers are frequently using widely available information and reviews when choosing foods, and they often consider ethical variables in addition to the obvious ones listed above. There is a movement toward supporting well-being, and consumers increasingly want to know that foods they buy contribute to their overall well-being.  

If we started with a blank chalkboard and listed aspects of food and food production that support well-being and represent ethical practices, what would we list? What are the variables that define “good food” from an ethical standpoint? Below is a starting list of 12 ethical dimensions of “good food.” Feel free to suggest others!

Ethical Dimensions of “Good Food”

  1. Nutritional Value (vitamins, minerals, nutrients, calories, fat, sugar, fiber, salt)                             
  2. Simplicity (how little it has been altered from its natural state – avoiding alterations that negatively affect human health)
  3. Purity (avoiding toxins, additives and filler ingredients)
  4. Growing Conditions (plants – avoiding use of suspected carcinogens and toxic pesticides; animals – avoiding using drugs or additives or feed that risk human health, humane conditions)
  5. Sourcing (ethical labor and production)
  6. Distribution (eco-transport)
  7. Brand (transparent, avoiding greenwashing and false claims)
  8. Sales and Marketing (honest and accurate, appropriate)
  9. Glycemic Index (impact on blood sugar levels)
  10. Inflammation Effect (immune system response)
  11. Avoidance of Harm (food is safe and does no harm)
  12. Wellness Impact (enhances overall wellness)

There are multiple dimensions of what “good food” means and expectations are continuing to increase.  Ideally good food would have a high nutritional value and would contribute to overall wellness, be ethically grown, produced, sourced, transported and sold. What does all of this mean for leaders? There’s a lot to consider beyond the taste test.

What other ethical variables would you add to this list?

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses. 

Includes case examples and questions.

 

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©2015 Leading in Context LLC

Forbes Business Article: “So You’d Like To Work in a More Ethical Culture?”

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Forbes published an article by Victor Lipman last week in which he responded to my post 40 Ways To Build an Ethical Culture. In the article, he discusses how leaders can use the practical list to build a better workplace. 

Why should we care about creating a proactive ethical culture? 

  • It keeps us sharp and agile and ready to respond to changing expectations
  • It makes our workplaces appealing to current and prospective employees
  • It attracts customers, suppliers and partners that care about ethics

What is the most positive reason of all to care about creating an ethical culture? We get to help people learn to make positive choices based on ethical values before they have problems (instead of just cleaning up ethical messes when it’s too late).

You can read the complete article at the link below.

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Help Your Leaders Cut Through Complexity By Learning To See Through The 7 Lenses. 

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©2015 Leading in Context LLC

 

Imperfectly Human

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By Linda Fisher Thornton

We are all imperfectly human.   We make mistakes. We do things that aren’t responsible.

Yes we ALL do things that aren’t responsible at times. If you think you’re exempt, let me ask you this. Have you never crept even one mile per hour over the speed limit? Have you never crossed the street outside of the marked cross walk? Have you never said something hurtful to another person?

Yes, we’re all imperfectly human. We need to plan ahead, to prepare ourselves for the moments when we may  be tempted to fall into imperfect behavior.

When we want to learn to drive a car, we learn safe and courteous driving rules. We practice driving for many hours on the road. We get feedback from experienced drivers and improve our driving over time. We eventually pass a driving test and are cleared to drive.

That leads me to wonder if we are preparing our leaders as carefully, or if we sometimes throw them into situations they are not prepared to handle. Do we give our “new leaders” the careful preparation we give new drivers? 

Are our leaders cleared to LEAD? 

Leaders do not think they are well prepared according the Ready-Now Leaders: DDI Global Leadership Forecast 2014-2015, which reports that “the overwhelming majority of leaders are still saying they are not satisfied with their organization’s development offerings.” Only “37% of leaders rated the quality of their organization’s development programs as high or very high.”

So where do we go from here?

Failing to prepare leaders for what they’ll face is not just potentially bad for their success, it’s also an ethical problem for their employees and for the organization. Without tools for handling complex challenges, people may make more mistakes than they need to. Some of those mistakes can be costly to the leader’s future and the organization’s reputation.

If we want leaders to be ready to handle the steep learning curve and the tough challenges that come with the job, we’ll need to do these things:

  • Help them handle the complexity that is a reality in their day-to-day leadership.
  • S-T-R-E-T-C-H them to help them prepare for the challenges they face as leaders in a global society.
  • Make them aware of their own mindsets and assumptions.
  • Build a sturdy culture based on positive ethical values.
  • Teach them how to PREVENT ethical problems, not just how to cope with them if they happen.
  • Show them how to add value for multiple constituents and think beyond themselves.
  • Provide clear support for ethical choices at all levels in the organization, including the C-Suite.
  • Make trust building a leadership priority.

Ask them if they’re ready

Ask your leaders how well prepared they think they are and listen carefully to their answers. Preparing leaders for success today requires much more than simply providing a training program and a handbook. It requires leadership development designed for people who are imperfectly human. 

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© 2013 Leading in Context LLC

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Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

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If Every Leader Cared

By Linda Fisher Thornton

I wonder what our workplaces would be like if every leader cared. Most leaders care about their own well-being. But what if every leader cared about others? How would things be different?

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In an organization where every leader cared, wouldn’t we experience improved employee engagement and customer retention? Wouldn’t it be easier to recruit and retain talented and dedicated employees? Wouldn’t we be able to get more done? 

If Every Leader Cared

  • Employees would pass the care they received on to coworkers, customers, suppliers, and other stakeholders.
  • Those happy coworkers, customers, suppliers and other stakeholders would pass the care on…
  • And we would all approach our work with more empathy and understanding
  • Each worker could accomplish more with caring support
  • And the organization would be more efficient and effective
  • Attracting customers, suppliers, and partners who cared…

This video is a great conversation starter about the importance of care and empathy for others. Use it to have conversations today about what it means to provide caring leadership in your organization.

 

I’ve named some scenarios that could happen in an organization where every leader cared. What would you add?

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses. 

Includes case examples and questions.

 

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©2015 Leading in Context LLC

The Power of Trustworthy Leadership

 

When-people-trust-theirBy Linda Fisher Thornton

Why is trustworthy leadership so powerful? How does it set a positive tone and lead organizations to better performance? These 5 reasons quickly come to mind.

 The Power of Trustworthy Leadership

1. Leading with values creates a safe work environment and builds trust.

2. When people trust their leaders, they are free to create amazing work.

3. When people trust their leaders, they are also more likely to trust each other.

4. Organizations with high trust release the natural creativity and potential of the people who work there.

5. The transformational effects of #1-4 above propel high-trust organizations to greater performance.

Leading in ways that build trust releases the inherent potential within the organization and its people. It brings out everyone’s best. And it’s gaining momentum. Are you part of the Trust Movement?

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses. 

Includes case examples and questions.

 

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©2015 Leading in Context LLC

With Ethics PREVENTION is the Cure

20150118_150650By Linda Fisher Thornton

Have you heard the expression “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure?” Eating healthy foods, exercising and getting enough sleep will help us prevent health problems. In the quest for good health, preventive habits make all the difference. It is generally easier for us to establish healthy habits than to correct persistent health problems once they start. 

There is an important parallel we can draw between human health and organizational health – prevention is also the best way to approach ethics in our organizations.

An organization with a PREVENTION mindset will take the time to clarify, discuss, engage, enable, support and measure ethical culture. Leaders will accept responsibility and be recognized and rewarded for positive ethics as well as other measures of success. If leaders achieve results using less than stellar ethics, they are mentored and coached to change, and if they can’t change, they are asked to leave. This pattern leads to “culture improvement,” and encourages others to uphold the highest ethics throughout the organization.

Organizations with a PREVENTION mindset are setting leaders up to succeed in an ethical sense and reducing the chances of having ethical problems.

An organization with a CURE mindset on the other hand will not take the time to clarify, discuss, engage, enable, support and measure ethical culture. It will assume that everything is “just fine” and deal with problems as they happen. If leaders use less than stellar ethics to achieve results, they may still get lucrative rewards. This pattern leads to “culture slide,” a disastrous shift in the ethical culture that encourages employees throughout the organization to violate ethical principles in order to earn lucrative promotions, pay increases, bonuses and other rewards.

Organizations with a CURE mindset are addressing problems after they have already eroded ethics and become difficult to eradicate.

While it is tempting to put off important prevention work because it takes time, how much time would we spend cleaning up an ethical mess that leads to penalties and fines and hits the news headlines? That brings to mind another old saying – “We reap what we sow.” If we want to be an ethical organization, only prevention (a positive commitment to ethical values) is a reliable cure.

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses. 

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Leadership Development S-T-R-E-T-C-H-E-S To Prepare for the Future

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By Linda Fisher Thornton

In a recent post, I acknowledged that “leaders face information overload, globalization and increasing complexity. And they hold the key to your organization’s future. Make it a priority to help them be ready.”

How can we prepare leaders to succeed in a socially and globally connected world? What are the strategies that will help them handle a wide variety of unpredictable situations while making ethical choices?

There are specific strategies that will help your leadership team prepare for the future. Organizations employing these strategies will help leaders S-T-R-E-T-C-H to stay on top of changing expectations.

BE CLEAR – KEEP IT RELEVANT –  GROUND LEARNING IN ETHICAL VALUES

To prepare leaders to make confident values-based choices, leadership development needs to be clear and based on positive ethical values. To make it worth the time spent participating, every aspect must be relevant to meeting their current challenges.

EMBRACE COMPLEXITY – HONOR LEARNING TRENDS – USE A GROWTH MINDSET

Leaders need support as they learn to embrace complexity (and seek meaning in an age of information overload).We will need to use a growth mindset, letting leaders know that we understand that learning to lead responsibly is a lifelong journey. We will need to honor learning trends and acknowledge that in many cases, leaders can be the architects of their own learning.

BUILD TRUST – WELCOME OPEN DIALOGUE 

Welcoming open dialogue about any aspect of leadership will help leaders feel comfortable asking questions. If we are going to make responsible leadership a way of life in our organization, we will also need to help them steep their leadership in mutual trust – which includes trusting others and being a trustworthy leader.

THINK AHEAD – PREPARE THEM FOR “LEADERSHIP FUTURE”

If we prepare leaders to handle today’s problems, that doesn’t mean they will be ready to handle the problems of tomorrow. The solution? Aim well ahead of the curve of change, to where the field of leadership is headed.

Leaders need a strong infrastructure grounded in ethical values and lots of opportunities for learning and conversation. With the pace of change accelerating, how does leadership development need to change? We must prepare leaders for where they’re going to be (not just where they are now) and help them stay competent in a rapidly changing world.

Learn More:

Changing Ethical Leadership Expectations

16 Trends Shaping the Future of Ethical Leadership.

11 Paths to Ethical Leadership Competence

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses. 

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©2015 Leading in Context LLC

Three Questions – Are Our Leaders Ready For The Future?

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Our future success is in the hands of our leaders. They will be the ones to notice and remove roadblocks, mentor employees and foresee future opportunities. They will be the ones to tackle the seemingly unsolvable problems of the future. Are they ready?

“Your organization’s future success depends on identifying and developing the next generation of its leaders.”  

Harrison Monarth, “Evaluate Your Leadership Development Program,”  HBR.org, January 22, 2015

Do they know how to think through complexity? Can they deal with it effectively while also making ethical decisions?

Organizations may prepare leaders to handle the challenges they face now, but that approach leaves them behind the curve of change.

These three questions will help you consider how ready your leaders are for the future:

Three Questions– Are Our Leaders Ready For The Future?

1. Are leaders capable of handling the complexity of work life and meeting ethical expectations?

            If so, how can we build on what they know in mentoring leaders across the organization?

            If not, is our approach to leadership development too oversimplified to be helpful?

2. Are leaders crystal clear about what ethical leadership requires of them in a global society?

            If so, how are we sharing that knowledge at every level?

            If not, is our ethical leadership information too vague to be actionable?

3. Are leaders bringing out the best in those they lead by leading with positive values and building trust?

             If so, how can customers, partners, suppliers & other stakeholders benefit from what we’ve learned?

             If not, how can we intentionally build a high-trust culture where people can do their best work?

Your leaders face information overload, globalization and increasing complexity. And they hold the key to your organization’s future. Make it a priority to help them be ready.

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Prepare Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future.

 7 Lenses is a positive solution – providing 7 Lenses and 14 Guiding Principles for leading responsibly in a complex world (Foreword by Stephen M. R. Covey)

Includes case examples and questions for leadership improvement.

 

LeadinginContext.com   Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership™

©2015 Leading in Context LLC

40 Ways to Build an Ethical Culture (An Ethical To Do List)

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By Linda Fisher Thornton

Last week I blogged about 40 Ethical Culture Gaps to Avoid. This week, I’m sharing a ‘What To Do” list of 40 Ways to Build an Ethical Culture. This list includes many ways to incorporate ethical values into daily organizational leadership. 

Each one of these 40 Ways to Build an Ethical Culture can improve an organization. Leaders paying attention to all of these factors will reap rewards that include improved employee engagement, better financial performance, increased productivity and job satisfaction, improved competitive position and more.

Use this “ethical to do list” to assess your culture. Put a check mark beside the positive ethical actions that you have observed in your organization. Any that you leave unchecked are opportunities for improvement.

40 Ways to Build an Ethical Culture

  1. ___Avoid Harm To a Wide Variety of Constituents
  2. ___Balance Ethics With Profitability and Results
  3. ___Carefully Build and Protect Trust
  4. ___Choose the Ethical Path, Even if Competitors Aren’t
  5. ___Clarify What “Ethical” Means in the Organization
  6. ___Clear Code of Ethics
  7. ___Clear Messages About Ethics and Values
  8. ___Commitment to Protecting the Planet
  9. ___Consistently Demonstrate Care and Respect for People
  10. ___Decision-Making Carefully Incorporates Ethics
  11. ___Develop Leaders in How To Implement Proactive Ethical Leadership
  12. ___Do Business Sustainably
  13. ___Enforce Ethical Expectations
  14. ___Embrace Corporate Social Responsibility
  15. ___Engaging and Relevant Ethics Training and Messages (Not The Same Old Boring Stuff)
  16. ___Ethical Actions Match Ethical Marketing
  17. ___Frequent Conversations About Ethics (That Honor Work Complexity)
  18. ___Full Accountability for Ethics At Every Level Including the C-Suite
  19. ___High Degree of Transparency
  20. ___Leaders Aware of Increasing Ethical Expectations
  21. ___Leaders Stay Competent as Times Change
  22. ___Open Leadership Communication and Invitation to Participate in Decisions
  23. ___Open, Supportive Leadership
  24. ___Performance Guidelines and Boundaries For Behavior
  25. ___Performance System Fully Integrated With Ethical Expectations
  26. ___Positive Ethical Role Models
  27. ___Recognize and Praise Ethical Actions
  28. ___Recognize and Punish Unethical Actions
  29. ___Safe Space to Discuss Ethical Grey Areas
  30. ___Set Ethical Boundaries
  31. ___Strong Commitment to Improving Leadership and Culture
  32. ___Take Broad Responsibility For Actions
  33. ___Think Long Term About Our Impact
  34. ___Treat Ethics as an Ongoing Priority
  35. ___Treat People With Care
  36. ___Use the Precautionary Principle
  37. ___Use Systems Thinking to See the Big Picture
  38. ___Values Mindset (Not A Compliance Mindset)
  39. ___Welcome and Act on Feedback From Constituents
  40. ___Willing to Do What it Takes to Become an Ethical Organization

When ethical culture is carefully tended, we are poised to meet the increasing expectations of our many stakeholders. Use this checklist of 40 Ways to Build an Ethical Culture to identify your organization’s current strengths and opportunities for improvement.

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40 Ethical Culture Gaps To Avoid

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By Linda Fisher Thornton

Leaders set the tone for how ethical values are applied. They mentor those they lead, and serve as positive role models. It is not enough, though. for them to talk about ethical values, model what they look like in action and mentor others. They must also fiercely protect the ethical dynamics within their organizations. They are also the caretakers of ethical culture.

Leaders are the tireless caretakers of ethical culture.

There are many types of ethical culture problems. Each one can cause trouble on its own. When several are at play, watch out – the organization is at risk of ethical failure. 

Use this list of 40 Gaps to Avoid to assess your culture. These are warning signs that your ethical culture is at risk. Put a check mark beside any that you have observed in your organization. 

40 Ethical Culture Gaps To Avoid

  1. ___Boring Ethics Training
  2. ___Compliance Mindset Instead of Values Mindset
  3. ___Controlling or Fear-Based Leadership
  4. ___Crowd Following, Regardless of the Ethical Implications
  5. ___Entitlement Mentality
  6. ___Failure to Build and Protect Trust
  7. ___Failure to Enforce Ethics Expectations
  8. ___Failure to Recognize and Praise Ethical Actions
  9. ___Failure to Recognize and Punish Unethical Actions
  10. ___Failure of Top Leaders to Take Responsibility For Actions
  11. ___Firing Scapegoats Instead of Fixing the Culture and Leadership
  12. ___Ignoring Boundaries
  13. ___Ignoring Complexity of Work and Complexity of Ethical Issues 
  14. ___Ignoring Customer and/or Employee Feedback
  15. ___Intentionally Causing Harm
  16. ___Lack of Accountability
  17. ___Lack of Care and Respect for People
  18. ___Lack of Clarity About What Ethics Means in the Organization
  19. ___Lack of Commitment to Protect the Planet
  20. ___Lack of a Moral Compass
  21. ___Lack of Performance System Integration
  22. ___Lack of Positive Role Models
  23. ___Lack of Relevant Ethics Training
  24. ___Lack of Transparency
  25. ___Leaders Not Aware of Increasing Ethical Expectations
  26. ___Leaders Not Staying Competent as Times Change
  27. ___Linear Problem-Solving
  28. ___Marketing an Organization as Ethical When It’s Not
  29. ___No Code of Ethics
  30. ___No Performance Guidelines or Boundaries For Behavior
  31. ___No Safe Space to Discuss Ethical Grey Areas
  32. ___Oversimplified Conversations About Ethics
  33. ___Oversimplified Decision-Making That Leaves Out Ethics
  34. ___Oversimplified Definition of “Ethical” (“Do the Right Thing”)
  35. ___Power Plays by Top Leaders Instead of Open Communication and Involvement
  36. ___Singular Focus on Profitability and Results
  37. ___Treating Ethics as an Event, Class, or Task Rather Than an Ongoing Priority
  38. ___Unintentionally Harming Constituents
  39. ___Vague Messages About Ethics and Values
  40. ___Widespread Acceptance That Unethical Behavior and Decisions Are “The Way Things Are Around Here”

Leaders need to be the “cultural caretakers,” always on the lookout for ways to improve the ethical dynamics in their organizations. Preventing these 40 Ethical Culture Gaps is a great start. 

 

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5 Ways To Bolster Your Organization’s Ethical Immune System

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By Linda Fisher Thornton

I was thinking about organizational culture recently, and noticed an interesting parallel. Actions such as eating healthy foods, exercising and getting enough sleep all boost our individual immune systems. What actions can we take to boost our ethical immune systems? And how could doing that help us create more ethical organizations?

Building a healthy ethical culture where people take steps to protect ethics and reputation takes intentional effort. It requires regular attention, similar to the way we must eat healthy foods and exercise daily to maintain our individual health.

An ethical organizational culture doesn’t just “happen” without leadership support. To support the overall ethical health of your organization, I recommend taking these 5 important leadership actions (and avoiding the corresponding DON’TS that undo the positive effects of ethical immunity).

1. DO Intentionally Ground Every Aspect Of Your Culture in Positive Ethical Values

(DON’T Leave ethics vague and just expect people to “do the right thing”)

2. DO Clarify Exactly What Ethical Leadership Looks Like in Action 

(DON’T give people ethical guidelines and leave them to figure out how to apply them to their ethical challenges)

3. DO Provide Resources For Ethical Thinking and Decision Making

(DON’T assume that people can make sense out of highly complex situations and choose the most ethical choices)

4. DO Create a Safe Environment For Talking About Ethical Challenges and Questions

(DON’T let the conversations happen only in ethics training – that’s not where people struggle with getting ethics right)

5. DO Model Ethical Leadership From The Top Down*

(DON’T Exempt the CEO and Senior Leadership from accountability for ethical leadership)

 *Failure to model ethical leadership at the highest levels of leadership is a common problem, and it destroys ethical immunity. 

For more guidance on ethical culture building, see these related articles:

7 Questions For Ethical Culture Building

Critical Roles of the (Ethical) CEO

How to Build an Ethical Culture

 

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Linda Fisher Thornton’s book 7 Lenses is your guide to proactive ethical leadership (in 7 dimensions that are all important).

 

 

 
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©2015 Leading in Context LLC

Leaders: Is Respect Enough?

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Respectful behavior makes it possible for people to work together successfully. But when we ask the teams we lead to be respectful, I wonder if we’re aiming too low. Shouldn’t we be asking for more? 

Are we just settling for “avoiding conflict and tension?” Are we missing an opportunity to teach those we lead that respect is the minimum standard for workplace behavior, and that there is so much more?

Respect is incredibly important. In the quest to create workplaces where people can find meaning and do their best work, I believe that we need to aim much higher. We need to teach people what it means to genuinely care about others and support their success. We need to show them how to be in service in the world. That’s real ethical leadership. Are you aiming high enough?

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7 Questions For Ethical Culture Building

By Linda Fisher Thornton

We create organizational culture through strategic choices and daily actions. If we imagine building our culture as creating an elaborate painting, what will we depict on the canvas? Will we work together to carefully paint a background theme of positive values, or will we just give everyone brushes and “see where it goes?”

122314PerfSysGrphcThe graphic shows ethical leadership as a human performance system. At the center of the system are Positive Ethical Values and Trust. The arrows show a perpetual process of communicating and reinforcing values and ethical choices.

Having seen this model, ask yourself these questions to assess how well ethical values are “painted” onto your cultural canvas:

Questions

1. If a group of strangers walked into our organization for the first time and spent the day with us, what would they say is on our cultural canvas? What values would they see in action?

2. What positive ethical values do we make the focal point of our culture?

3. How will we “paint” those values in a lasting way onto the canvas of our culture?

4. How will we build the deep level of trust that is necessary for open conversation?

5. How will we align all of our messages and reward systems to aim directly toward the ethical values we say are important?

6. How will we prepare leaders to paint ethical values onto our cultural canvas through their daily leadership?

7. How will we know when everyone in the organization is committed to our values? What will we see happening?

When we communicate clear values and make trust a priority, we are creating positive conditions for:

  • making a lasting difference
  • bringing out the best in the organization
  • protecting our ethics

When our cultural canvas is clearly painted with ethical values and trust, the result may be a true masterpiece – an ethical organization.

 

 
  7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
  2014 Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
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It’s All About The Trust

Trust is pivotal because it is the basis of every human relationship, every transaction, and every market.”

Dennis Nally, The Trust Agenda, Strategy & Business, PwC Strategy& Inc. Summer 2014

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Monday I received the wonderful news that I was in the Trust Across America-Trust Around the World 2015 Top 100 Thought Leaders in Trust. I consider this a great honor because trust is critical to successful business. Trust improves communication, culture, performance, engagement and results.

Today I’m sharing some inspiring quotes from recent trust reports about why “it’s all about the trust” – why trust has such broad importance and impact in work relationships and organizations:

“Gaining trust from society at large also requires understanding what value means to a wider range of stakeholders than many companies are used to—including not just shareholders, but customers, employees, local community members, government officials, and others.”

Dennis Nally, The Trust Agenda, Strategy & Business, PwC Strategy& Inc. Summer 2014

 “Well-being promotes the greater business good and what’s good for the individual is good for the organization and its customers. Because of this, an organization needs to think about the work experience from their employees’ point of view and consider whether policies, structures and workplace culture are adding to their well-being or detracting from it.”

Justin Heifitz, Gallup Business Journal, December 15, 2014

 

“80 percent of respondents said that they chose to buy a particular product or servicebecause they trusted the company behind it. Sixty-three percent said they refused to purchase a product or service because they distrusted a particular company.”

Edelman Trust Barometer 2015, Executive Summary

 

“By focusing on building trust, companies can develop a compelling identity, one that sets them apart from competitors—assuming that they have the intent to deliver and the capabilities to do so.”

Dennis Nally, The Trust Agenda, Strategy & Business, PwC Strategy& Inc. Summer 2014

 

“For their part, senior leaders need to invest in systems, rewards, and habits that make it easy for managers faced with complexity and constant change to make solid commitments, connect the dots with other groups, and remember their promises. This is how thriving businesses create an upward spiral of trust and strong results.”

Elizabeth Doty, Does Your Company Keep Its Promises? strategy+business, July 18, 2014

In every dimensions of success, from employee engagement to stakeholder confidence to customer retention, building successful organizations really is all about the trust.

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7 Lenses (Foreword by Stephen M. R. Covey) is a practical roadmap for learning the kind of proactive ethical leadership that builds lasting trust.

 
7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics  2014 Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 
@leadingincontxt  @7Lenses  
 
LeadinginContext.com
 
Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership™    
 
 
 
             
 
 
 
 
© 2015 Leading in Context LLC
 
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