Does “Politically Correct” Mean Inclusive and Respectful?

By Linda Fisher Thornton

I studied Linguistics and Communications at The University of Virginia and I am fascinated by how words shape our perception of things. Lately there has been a lot of discussion about the term “politically correct,” sometimes shortened to “PC.” I have noticed it is used when people refer to the pressure to be polite to all people, including those who are different from themselves. 

Unethical Leadership: Selective Inclusion

By Linda Fisher Thornton

I previously wrote about the problem of selective respect and today I’ll address it’s evil twin. It has been happening right in front of us and has been amplified by social media – leaders speaking from a perspective of selective inclusion. This week, I’m sharing a collection of posts that explain the importance of full inclusion and how to recognize examples that stray from it.

Inclusion: The Power of “Regardless”

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Some inclusion statements begin with “we respect all people and treat them fairly, regardless of…” and then include a long list of differences that we should overcome. These lists are hard to communicate, difficult to remember and ever-changing as we expand our understanding of human rights.

Differences or Inclusion – Which Are We Focusing On?

Diversity can be Divisive

When we talk about diversity, we are noticing differences. That may not seem like a profound statement at first, but think about it for a moment. Diversity is about having different types of employees, right? And that’s a good thing for productivity and innovation, isn’t it? It is a good thing. But it’s not enough.

Managing diversity without inclusion as the ultimate goal can make a big difference in the way employees experience our organization.

Recognizing Ethical Issues (Part 5)

By Linda Fisher Thornton

In Part 1 of this series on Recognizing Ethical Issues, I addressed the gaps in our thinking that require us to develop an ethical alert system. in Part 2, I explored why some leaders who want to do the right thing still don’t “do the work” to learn how to do it. In Part 3, I dug into the importance of ethical awareness as the basis for ethical decision making. Part 4 described ways to start developing ethical thinking. In Part 5, I share some recent posts that address current societal issues. Read the ones below that strike you as the most relevant, to learn about how to recognize the nuances of ethical issues in current events and make good decisions about them.

The Danger of Us Versus Them

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Any time you draw a line that excludes, you’re leaving ethical territory. That’s a bold statement, but when someone draws a dividing line that intentionally excludes people or groups, it can lead to an “us versus them” mentality. And from there, it’s a short slippery slope to this and more…

Aligning Strategy and Values

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Consumers are seeking brands that support well-being, sustainability and social justice, realizing that brands that care about these things are more likely to have the best interests of consumers and society at heart. Brands will be well served to assess their alignment between values, culture and strategy.

The Journey to Authentic Leadership

By Linda Fisher Thornton

The journey to authentic leadership is not an easy one. It’s full of challenges, and it requires developing a high level of self- and other-awareness over time. “Knowledge experiences” alone won’t be enough to stimulate the kind of learning that is required on this important journey.

How Values Change Everything

By Linda Fisher Thornton
of values as a critical element in enabling and focusing individual and collective success. Values shape your life, leadership, career and relationships.

If you are currently going through life without knowing what your values are, you’re missing out on a powerful force for good that can offer a turbo-charged boost to propel you to where you want to go.

This week I’m sharing how values change everything. Take a look at some of the many ways that values are transformational, and if you haven’t identified yours yet, I’ll share some advice on how to get started.

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Redefining Leadership With the Values Built In

Linda Fisher Thornton tells the human story of the kind of leadership we need – fully inclusive, respecting differences, and building trust inside organizations and across boundaries. Her book 7 Lenses has received global rave reviews and endorsements from top leadership thinkers.

Ethical Awareness is a Moving Target

By Linda Fisher Thornton

How well is your organization navigating the ethical pitfalls of the working world? If you’re finding it to be a major challenge right now, you’re not alone.

Why is it so hard to navigate ethical minefields now? There is currently a “toxic soup” of factors at play…

Leadership: Evaluating Ethical Awareness

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Ethical awareness may have been considered private in the past, but it has become easier to observe in a society that is always socially connected. Since ethical reputation is a defining element in individual and organizational success, it is time that we consider ethical awareness as a key element of experience when selecting leaders for our businesses, community organizations, governments, and nations.

How to Be Human (Together)

By Linda Fisher Thornton

This week I’m sharing an edited compilation of three previously published posts that are relevant for leaders and organizations wanting to honor human rights in chaotic times. The first addresses the risk of excluding any humans from our organizational statement of inclusion. The second explains why values transcend borders and boundaries, and the third explains that how we perceive people who are ‘different’ impacts our behavior and our ethics.

Companies Doing Good in Bad Times

By Linda Fisher Thornton

A pandemic happens to all of us. All our plans are scrapped and we have to reinvent ourselves in real time, with others depending on us for services. It is the ultimate leadership challenge.