3 Insights For the Class of 2022

By Linda Fisher Thornton

I have a special message for our 2022 graduates. The pandemic risk may be lower than it was at this time last year, but sorting out the way forward as a new graduate is still going to be a challenge.

How can you gain a clear focus on your future to move ahead?

The Give and Take of Trust

By Linda Fisher Thornton

The post Should Trust Be Freely Offered or Conditionally Earned generated lively discussions in LinkedIn Groups about extending trust when we meet someone new. It was clear from reading the discussions that trust has many different dimensions.

Readers shared how they perceived trust – some saw it as an emotion, some saw it as a relationship, others described it as a mindset. They took the discussion beyond the original question and explored how we extend trust to others based on many variables.

How Do You Recognize An Ethical Leader (Part 3)

By Linda Fisher Thornton

n How Do You Recognize an Ethical Leader Part 1 and Part 2, I shared 6 special qualities, behaviors and outcomes that define ethical leadership. This week I’ll share three more. These are intentional actions ethical leaders take to stay competent as things change around them.

Unethical Leadership: Selective Inclusion

By Linda Fisher Thornton

I previously wrote about the problem of selective respect and today I’ll address it’s evil twin. It has been happening right in front of us and has been amplified by social media – leaders speaking from a perspective of selective inclusion. This week, I’m sharing a collection of posts that explain the importance of full inclusion and how to recognize examples that stray from it.

Leading In Times of Wear and Tear

By Linda Fisher Thornton

We’ve been through a lot. We’re tired, worn out, overwhelmed, and stretched too thin. We’re worried about our health and well-being and the health and well-being of those we love. We can’t lead as if we were in normal times because we’re definitely not and everyone knows it.

What is Ethical Leadership? Part 3

By Linda Fisher Thornton

In part 3 of this series, I am sharing a clip from my recent talk at the Saint Anselm Center for Ethics in Society that answers the question “What happens when there is a serious conflict between two ethical values?” As you watch, think about the tradeoffs you and your organization have had to manage as you navigated the global pandemic.

Top 10 Posts of 2021: Leading in Context Blog

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Of the 52 individual posts published on the Leading in Context Blog in 2021, these 10 were the most popular. See if you notice a theme that connects these new topics that readers accessed most frequently:

Wishing You Renewal

By Linda Fisher Thornton

As you enter the holiday season and 2021 comes to a close, I wish you a season of personal renewal.

We have all lost something, whether it be time, independence, social interaction, a sense of safety, or good health.

Conquer These Leadership Temptations In The New Year

By Linda Fisher Thornton

We’re starting a new year, with fresh possibilities, and it is a good time to think about our leadership values. What do we believe? How do we treat others? What matters to us? Can people determine our values by watching how we treat people?

22 Quotes to Inspire Leaders in the New Year (Part 1)

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Are your leaders prepared for the year ahead? Each day will bring new challenges, and to succeed within ethical boundaries, we’ll all need a clear picture of “good leadership.”

This series is an annual tradition and this year’s posts include 22 quotes (each linked to a post with leadership guidance) to inspire you to grow your leadership skills to be ready for whatever 2022 may bring. Part 1 includes the first 11.

Don’t Let Your Ego Undermine Your Leadership

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Ego has a way of undoing even our best intentions as leaders. We have to be aware of our ego and manage it to avoid getting off track. In a world that requires rapid adaptation to changing events and circumstances, ego tries to maintain the status quo and works against our ability to pivot in response to change. Think of the adaptable leader as piloting a boat, able to turn at a moment’s notice as the situation warrants it. The ego-driven leader, in contrast, is living in a fortress with a moat around it, protecting status and the status quo at all cost. The fortress can’t move, can’t pivot, can’t adapt to changing circumstances.