Top Post Series of 2019: Leading in Context Blog

By Linda Fisher Thornton

The Top Post Series this year reflects the challenges of applying ethical thinking and decision making to complex problems.

This series answers the important question “How do we analyze and understanding the multiple connected variables in a changing context to make responsible choices? Today I’ll share a quote from each post in the series that will give you a quick overview of the topic.

The Complexity of Ethical Thinking and Decision Making (Part 4)

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Who we include in our ethical thinking, and how broadly we consider our responsibility to others are important elements of ethical leadership. In Part 1 of this series, I explored the Depth of our thinking, and in Part 2, I broke down issues related to understanding Context. In Part 3, I looked at Complexity. In Part 4, we'll dig into the importance of Inclusion.

The Complexity of Ethical Thinking and Decision Making (Part 3)

Embracing Complexity is Part of Leadership

Complexity has become a way of life. To make ethical decisions, we must embrace it and incorporate it into our thinking process. That means digging in to issues until we understand their multiple dimensions, connections and contradictions. It means being intentional about decision making and avoiding making snap judgments.

The Complexity of Ethical Thinking and Decision Making (Part 1)

By Linda Fisher Thornton

When Thinking is Starved For Context and Complexity

Think about how easy it is to start using shallow breathing without being aware that we're doing it. This can happen when we're stressed or anxious, and it can impact our well-being. We may be unaware that we are using shallow breathing until someone notices we're turning pale and tells us to BREATHE.

When we use shallow thinking, that similarly impacts the "well-being" of our decision making, leading us to false conclusions and ethically problematic decisions. It's almost as if when we use shallow thinking, our decision making is getting less oxygen. We can medically treat people who are having trouble breathing. But what do we do about thinking that is starved for context and complexity?

Healthy Media Consumption

By Linda Fisher Thornton

I've blogged about how to spot fake news and variables complicating media ethics. Today I'll explore the characteristics healthy media consumption. Let's begin with a dose of healthy skepticism. 

Healthy Skepticism

You can't believe everything you see. Photographs and videos that appear to be "proof" of a story may have been altered. Your best best is to choose your sources of information carefully so that you can reasonably be assured that what you are seeing and hearing is real.

Top Post Series of 2018: Leading in Context Blog

By Linda Fisher Thornton The Top Post Series this year reflects a concern I have that many other people must share. It is a concern about what can happen when we don't use ethical thinking. This series answers the important…

Which Values Are Ethical Values?

By Linda Fisher Thornton

My Applied Ethics students asked a great question that I want to answer in today's post: "Which Values Are Ethical Values?"

Quick Overview

Not all values are ethical values. Some values, such as efficiency, do not have an ethical component. Some ethical values involve qualities of an ethical self (such as honesty and integrity). Others describe positive and ethical behavior toward others, the environment and society.

Want To Thrive in Leadership Future? Tether Yourself To Values

By Linda Fisher Thornton

It would be "easy [...] for organizations and leaders to become frozen by the magnitude of the changes under way" (McKinsey & Co., Management Intuition For the Next 50 Years). Success in future leadership requires being nimble and adaptive, flexing with constant change, and being ready for anything.

How should we stay grounded as we avoid crises and manage our way through a maze of increasing expectations?

Focusing on Profits? Watch Out For the “Blinder” Effect

By Linda Fisher Thornton

We need profits to exchange goods and services, pay bills and grow our businesses. So what's the problem with it? The problem is that profitability cannot become our defining business goal, and it cannot replace values as the central beacon of our decision-making.