What Does it Mean to Win?

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By Linda Fisher Thornton

What it means to “win” in business has changed. Driving this change is a greater awareness of the impact we have on each other:

  • A better understanding of our global connectedness
  • An awareness that laws aren’t ideal ethical standards, just punishment thresholds
  • A greater focus on human rights and dignity and human well-being
  • Increased attention on the well-being of communities

The message used to be “WIN at all cost” to achieve strong financial performance. Then we began to consider what happened to  other people when we “won at all cost” and “Win-Win” became the mantra. As we gradually became aware of our many stakeholders, “Win-Win-Win” looked better – paying attention to the triple bottom line, our impact on Profits, People and the Planet. 

When we consider our interdependence and the leadership context, the way we think about a “win” changes. 

Driving this change is also a greater awareness of the global context:

  • Our constituents are global, and our impact is global
  • We are part of a connected, global economy
  • We are experiencing dwindling natural spaces and increasing demand for natural resources
  • Global citizenship is a growing issue as we deal with border management and complex social issues
  • Leadership and ethical duties are inseparable if we are going to create a positive environment, locally and globally

The triple bottom line, a great improvement over “win at all cost,” is only the beginning. The future of work will require much more. Taking extended stakeholders and the broad responsibilities of corporate social responsibility into account, we are ultimately looking for a 7 Way Win. To learn more, see The Triple Bottom Line is Just the Beginning and 7 Definitions of “Good” (Why We Disagree About Ethics).

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future. 

Learn how ethical expectations are increasing, and what you can do to stay ahead of the curve.  

 

 

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Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

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Leaders: Can Rights and Responsibilities Be Separated?

There-is-a-growing

By Linda Fisher Thornton

This week I want to take a moment to reflect on the question “Can rights and responsibilities be separated?” Clearly they are both part of good citizenship and ethical leadership. But what happens if we try to separate them?

Rights Without Responsibility?

If we demand our rights but fail to live up to our responsibilities, we will have a negative impact on others. 

If we assert individual rights without also taking responsibility, we are asking for more than we are willing to give. We are conveying that what we want is more important than what others want. We are demanding that our needs be met without caring about what happens to others.

Under those circumstances the answer to “Can rights and responsibilities be separated?” is “Yes, but not ethically.”

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

Learn how ethical expectations are increasing, and what you can do to stay ahead of the curve.  

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Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

 

 

Is Moral Development Observable?

 

 

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By Linda Fisher Thornton

Most of us have some idea about human development because we have watched people grow up and pass through stages and milestones in their lives. We have seen babies roll over and sit up, and later walk on their own. We have watched children grow into teenagers and become adults.

Moral development is just as important as physical development, and should be going on at the same time as physical development, but it is not visible in terms of a person’s appearance. Because it is not visible, its important role in human development is sometimes overlooked.

Moral development is dependent on learning, so it is vital that organizations provide an environment that forwards moral learning. There are specific things that organizations can do to encourage moral development in leadership. They include teaching systems thinking and how to seek mutual benefit when making decisions.

Moral development requires learning. It doesn’t just happen.

There are also things parents can do to encourage moral development in children. “Young people need help learning how to succeed in living positive ethical values in a world filled with distractions and negative messages. Our job is to help them center themselves in positive ethical values and get to know themselves as good people.” (Thornton, Helping Young People Become Ethical Leaders, Leading in Context Blog)

To “observe” someone’s level of moral development, look beyond what they say to their behavior and their choices. Notice how well they treat others. Look for how well they seek solutions that benefit all parties, not just themselves. Notice what they value. Notice how consistently they think beyond their own interests and concerns to attend to the concerns of others.  These are the ways that moral development is made visible. 

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Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

Includes how ethical expectations are increasing, and what you can do to stay ahead of the curve.

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Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

 

 

What Is Organizational Integrity?

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By Linda Fisher Thornton

Individual integrity is the full alignment in what a person thinks, says and does. Taking that concept to another level, this post will explore the question “what is organizational integrity?”

Clearly, organizational integrity is broader than individual integrity, but what does it include? It seems to me that taking the concept of individual integrity to the organizational level, organizational integrity would mean full alignment in what an organization thinks, says and does.

When an organization demonstrates full alignment, all company messages, actions, decisions, leadership and rewards align. It’s not enough to just ensure alignment, though, because alignment without values can lead an organization away from ethical decisions and actions.

Messages, actions, decisions, leadership and rewards  must be aligned around positive ethical values that the entire organization supports.

This positive values-based alignment in what an organization values, says and does creates the scaffolding for an ethical culture. What does your organization say it values? How consistently does it live out those values in daily practice?

If your leaders are all perfectly clear about which high level ethical values to uphold and how to demonstrate them, you are probably incorporating complexity into your leadership development. You are also probably providing leaders with the level of detail about ethical values that they need to navigate through information overload, constant change and demands from multiple stakeholders. If not, you may be rolling the dice by taking an “I’ll know it when I see it” approach to ethics.

Linda Fisher Thornton, “What Is Integrity?: Beyond I’ll Know it When I See It”, Leading in Context Blog

Leaders are the key to values alignment – they model and reinforce values and hold people accountable for following them. Organizational integrity (at its most effective) is what happens when leaders consistently immerse an organization in positive ethical values and align all leadership, actions, decisions, messages, and reward systems accordingly.

 

 

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

Includes how ethical expectations are increasing, and what you can do to stay ahead of the curve.

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LeadinginContext.com  

Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

 

 

5 Insights Into Leadership Development Future (Part 5)

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By Linda Fisher Thornton

This is the 5th post in a series called 5 Insights Into Leadership Development Future. 

Here are the 4 previous posts in the series in case you missed them:

Part 1 on Global Trends

Part 2 on Wholeness 

Part 3 on Growth and Human Development

Part 4 on Positive Ethical Values and the Search For Meaning

This final post will build on the previous 4 posts in this series and discuss how to prepare leaders for the workplace of the future. 

To help leaders adapt to increasing global leadership expectations and catastrophic change, we’ll need to: 

  • RETHINK everything we’re doing to help people succeed in leadership
  • ZOOM OUT to give them the whole picture, and 
  • REBUILD their leader awareness at a higher level

Author’s Note: I have packed three years of leadership research across disciplines into the guide 7 Lenses to help you navigate the process. Chapters where you’ll find specific topics are noted below.

To respond to increasing ethical expectations and the need for meaning and growth, we’ll need to discuss:

  • Leadership as Both a Responsibility and an Opportunity (Part I)
  • Leadership as Relational (Chapter 5)
  • The Impact of Ethical Values on Creating a Positive Workplace Culture (Chapters 2 and 5)
  • The Human Impact of Trust (Chapter 5)

To help leaders take their thinking to a higher level, to handle the complexity of their challenges, we’ll need to dig into:

  • How Thinking Drives Behavior (With or Without a Leader’s Permission) (Chapter 6)
  • The Broad-Reaching Impact of Leader Choices (Chapter 3)
  • How Ethical Leaders Must be Personally and Contextually Congruent (Chapter 4)
  • The Kind of Thinking That Ethical Leaders Choose to Use (Chapter 6)

To help leaders stay motivated while they’re learning, we’ll need to provide:

  • Insight Into the Long-Term Nature of the Leadership Learning Journey (Chapter 1)
  • Tangible Benefits (to Leaders and Organizations) of Proactive Ethical Leadership (Chapter 2)
  • Tools and Strategies for Handling Complexity (Chapter 3)
  • Our Evolving Understanding of the Purpose of Leadership (Chapter 8)

We are learning our way forward in developing leaders for the workplace of the future while they are learning their way forward through complexity, economic challenges and catastrophic change. We will need to stay ahead of that curve to prepare them. 
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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

Includes how ethical expectations are increasing, and what you can do to stay ahead of the curve.

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Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

Leaders, Don’t You Care? (9 Red Flags That Tell Employees You Don’t)

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Demonstrating care is one of the hallmark requirements of good leadership. In addition to caring about what happens in our own careers, we must CARE about people, about their success, and about creating a positive work environment. If leaders don’t seem to care, that harms the organization’s culture.

The 9 behaviors below are red flags for employees – pointing out that a leader doesn’t care.

9 Red Flags That Tell Employees You Don’t Care

  1. Being too busy to meet with people
  2. Not showing interest in people or their success
  3. Asking about how someone is doing, then losing interest or becoming distracted when they answer
  4. Breaking promises, not acting on commitments
  5. Telling people you’re sure they’ll figure it out on their own when they come to you for help
  6. Failing to recognize accomplishments and milestones
  7. Asking people to do some of your work, then taking credit for it
  8. Withdrawing during times of change when support is most needed
  9. Making YOUR OWN success more important than THEIRS (missing the point that as a leader, their success is the measure of your own)

All 9 of these choices hurt employees who want to do their best and who want a manager who believes in them. They are behaviors that damage trust, reduce engagement and limit productivity. 

The bottom line? Acting like you don’t care might work if you’re leading a team of robots – but people expect more.

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

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Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

What Does it Mean to “Be a Leader?”

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By Linda Fisher Thornton

Leadership is not about being “in charge” or standing “at the front of the room” or “exercising personal power.” Authentic ethical leadership flips that paradigm. 

The authentic ethical leader is:

  • Standing beside, encouraging, supporting, guiding
  • Standing in the back offering encouragement
  • Stepping aside when people are capable of doing the work without support
  • Stepping forward to remove obstacles and clear the path for success
  • Taking responsibility and sharing credit
  • Being available and ready to help

This is the work of leadership.

Do not be fooled by someone trying to use power for personal gain. Bottom line — If it’s loud, self-serving and egotistical, it’s not leadership. 

 

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5 Insights Into Leadership Development Future (Part 4)

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By Linda Fisher Thornton

This post is Part 4 in the series “5 Insights Into Leadership Development Future.” 

The previous posts in the series in case you missed them:

Part 1 on Global Trends

Part 2 on Wholeness 

Part 3 on Growth and Human Development

In Part 4, we take a look at positive ethical values and the search for meaning.

Leaders need to help diverse groups of meaning-seekers thrive.

One way they do that is by leading with positive values. 

The best leaders are modeling leadership that is infused with ethical values like care, respect, sustainability and community service. They demonstrate that they understand the role that values play in good leadership.

Ethical values will increasingly be considered an important element of what it means to lead. 

“Recommendations for future research to promote the development and measurement of leaders who have morality, ethics, and authenticity as foundational behaviors to their leadership.”

Mary Kay Copeland, THE EMERGING SIGNIFICANCE OF VALUES BASED LEADERSHIP: A LITERATURE REVIEW, International Journal of Leadership Studies, Vol. 8 Iss. 2, 2014 

The best leaders are clear about their own values, they model the values of the organization, they follow laws, regulations and policies and they reach higher than laws to lead with positive ethical values. They do it because it’s the right thing to do, and they find that it also benefits them and their businesses in powerful ways.

Ethical values inspire meaning-seekers who want to do more than “just show up.” 

Learning to lead with positive ethical values meets a number of human and organizational needs (that go way beyond compliance with laws and regulations). 

  • People can do their best work in a positive, supportive environment where leaders strive for excellence, innovation and ethical leadership
  • Positive ethical values help leaders find their way through the maze, handling complex issues that are naturally part of the leadership role
  • Making decisions using ethical values helps leaders handle complexity without falling into ethical problems
  • Leading with positive ethical values fulfills a powerful human need for meaning and difference making

What can happen when leaders work to create meaningful work spaces where people can thrive? They are likely to find meaning themselves by helping others grow.

5 Actions to Take Now

What actions can we take now?

  1. Teach positive ethical values and make them an integral part of all leadership learning experiences in every setting. Make sure leaders know how powerfully those values attract meaning-seeking employees. 
  2. Drive your message home by hiring, promoting and rewarding leaders who treat everyone with respect and lead with positive ethical values.
  3. Make it clear that in good leadership, ethical values are more important than monetary gain or personal power.
  4. Provide a safe space to discuss how to apply ethical values in your organization, and explore how ethical values help people find meaning in their work.
  5. Help leaders learn how to think through ethical challenges using positive values (it takes practice).

More to Come: Stay tuned for #5 in the series!

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

Includes how ethical expectations are increasing, and what you can do to stay ahead of the curve.

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Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

Reflections on Truth (Are You a Seeker?)

 

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By Linda Fisher Thornton

Reflections on Truth

We’ve heard the expressions “truth is in the eye of the beholder” and “the truth shall set you free.” What is this truth that so many have spoken of? How do we find it? How does it relate to ethics? Ponder those important questions as you explore this collection of quotes about truth.

A Collection of Important Quotes About Truth 

There is no greatness where there is no simplicity, goodness and truth.                                                                                                                                         Leo Tolstoy

Truth is certainly a branch of morality and a very important one to society.                                                                                                                                 Thomas Jefferson

Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.                                                                                                   Marcus Aurelius

There’s a world of difference between truth and facts. Facts can obscure the truth.                                                                                                                         Maya Angelou

If there were only one truth, you couldn’t paint a hundred canvases on the same theme.                                                                                                                Pablo Picasso

Justice and truth are such subtle points that our tools are too blunt to touch them accurately.                                                                                                         Blaise Pascal

The truth is a snare: you cannot have it, without being caught. You cannot have the truth in such a way that you catch it, but only in such a way that it catches you.

Soren Kierkegaard

The truth is rarely pure and never simple.

Oscar Wilde

The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie, deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive and unrealistic.             John F. Kennedy

People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe.                                                                                                         Andy Rooney

If you would be a real seeker after truth, it is necessary that at least once in your life you doubt, as far as possible, all things.                                               Rene Descartes

There are only two mistakes one can make along the road to truth; not going all the way, and not starting.
Buddha

Knowledge rests not upon truth alone, but upon error also.

Carl Jung

The dream begins with a teacher who believes in you, who tugs and pushes and leads you to the next plateau, sometimes poking you with a sharp stick called ‘truth’.
Dan Rather

The pursuit of truth and beauty is a sphere of activity in which we are permitted to remain children all our lives.
Albert Einstein

According to the wisdom in these quotations, truth is not simple or easily found and there is an element of growth and open-mindedness required on the seeker’s journey. 

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

Includes how ethical expectations are increasing, and what you can do to stay ahead of the curve.

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Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

5 Insights Into Leadership Development Future (Part 2)

By Linda Fisher Thornton

This post is Part 2 in a series called “5 Insights Into Leadership Development Future.” Each post in this series will address trends in leadership development and how to prepare leaders for success in a complex, connected global society (In case you missed it, Part 1 addressed trends in ethical awareness, leading with values and changes in the learning landscape). 

GIVE LEADERS THE WHOLE PICTURE

We are beginning to think more holistically about the leadership role, including its global scope and broad impact. Today I want to describe the important trend toward wholeness that is helping us improve our effectiveness in many arenas and will be changing our approach to leadership development.  

Have you noticed that: 

  • In health care, we are moving away from just treating symptoms to supporting wellness
  • In the workplace, we are moving away from focusing on treating specific individual groups of people well toward a goal of full inclusion
  • In education, we are (slowly) beginning to embrace preparing the whole child for a good life rather than focusing only on knowledge and test scores
  • In religion, we are beginning to understand common values, rather than focusing only on separate religious traditions
  • In business, we are beginning to think about ourselves as one global community rather than just a disparate set of countries and boundaries

This trend toward wholeness is informing approaches to leadership development in important ways. To see how well you’re helping leaders adapt to this trend, ask yourself:

Are we giving leaders the whole picture and expanding their awareness of how things connect? Are we helping them see global patterns and trends? – Help Them See the Connections

Are we developing them as whole leaders, addressing their thinking processes and habits and not just their observable skills? – Help Them Understand Their Own Leadership Terrain

Are we giving them a holistic picture of leadership responsibility and not just focusing on laws and ethics codes? – Help Them See the Full Scope of Ethical Leadership Responsibility

Applying the trend toward wholeness to the way we develop leaders can have powerful positive effects. For example, we can help leaders examine and improve their leadership thinking – to find out where they might be thinking narrowly and not holistically. 

Marian N. Ruderman, Cathleen Clerkin, and Carol Connolly From The Center For Creative Leadership extend an invitation in their white paper Leadership Development Beyond Competencies: Moving to a Holistic Approach – “We call upon leadership developers to work together as a concerned community, to move beyond the established competency approach to offer deeper levels of leadership development.”

Specific Actions You Can Take Now to Help Leaders Adapt:

  1. Address leader learning on the internal as well as external aspects of leadership, helping leaders learn to manage their unconscious thoughts and become aware of how their thoughts can affect their behavior
  2. Help leaders understand the dimensions of what it means to take responsibility in leadership
  3. Get them talking about the places where they are observing a trend toward wholeness, and the impact of this trend on their lives and leadership

More to Come: I will be continuing this series with more important trends in leadership development and actions you can take to help leaders adapt.  Stay tuned for Part 3!

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

Includes how ethical expectations are increasing, and what you can do to stay ahead of the curve.

Click the cover to read a free preview!

 

LeadinginContext.com  

Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

The Future of “Leadership” (Do We Need a New Word For It?)

By Linda Fisher Thornton

While we are experiencing many global challenges, there is also a gradual global push toward better leadership.

There are many trends moving us toward a point where we clearly understand “leadership” to include good ethics and exclude any behavior that is purely self-serving or harmful to others. 

We have seen enough people making poor ethical decisions in the name of “leadership” to realize that we need to change something.  Some people may even think that things have gotten so bad that the term “leadership” should be replaced.

I disagree. Our understanding of what leadership means is evolving, so we shouldn’t throw out the word and replace it with a new one. We should continue the movement toward clearly re-defining it at a higher level.

What does redefining leadership at a higher level mean? 

  • When we say “leadership,” we will automatically include ethical responsibilities along with opportunities and benefits. 
  • When we say “leadership,” we will think “a privilege to serve” and not “a position of power.”
  • When we say “leadership,” we will think of the most humble, dedicated people who, working with others, try to leave the world better than they found it.

With this higher level understanding of leadership, we will never mistake a greedy, dishonest, fraudulent , harmful, toxic or care-less person who happens to have a title for a real leader. We will not be distracted by smoke and mirrors. We will look for substance and service. 

I am optimistic and I believe that this is the future of leadership. 

What do you think?  Are you ready to redefine leadership at a higher level? Are you ready to separate self-serving psuedo-leadership from real leadership?

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Bring Out Your Leadership Best: Learn To See Through 7 Lenses®. 

Includes how ethical expectations are increasing, and what you can do to stay ahead of the curve.

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Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

Are You Squeezing Every Drop Out of Your Talent?

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By Linda Fisher Thornton

You may have thought this post was going to be about how to get people to do more and to achieve more.  It is about that, but not in the way you might think. In my experience, when the leader improves, everybody can do more. Bear with me as I describe for you how you can get the most out of your people by squeezing every drop out of your own talent and potential.

Think about how carefully you squeeze the last bit of toothpaste out of the tube, or finish the last bit of orange juice before recycling the container. You want to get every drop, right? Applying that same mentality to your leadership, you’ll want to get the most out of it that you possibly can, by:

  • Learning proactively
  • Keeping up with changing leadership expectations
  • Staying competent in every aspect of your work
  • Reaching for your ethical best and setting a good example for others to follow
  • Asking your team how you can improve your leadership, and learning how to live up to their expectations

When you put consistent effort into leading, and work to get more out of your own talent, everyone on your team benefits. The results can be extraordinary. While it may seem counter-intuitive, squeezing every drop out of OUR leadership talent is what brings out THEIR best performance.

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Bring Out Your Leadership Best: Learn To See Through 7 Lenses®. 

Includes how ethical expectations are increasing, and what you can do to stay ahead of the curve.

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Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

 

 

What Does “Good Leadership” Mean?

 

Our-understanding-of (2)

By Linda Fisher Thornton

We need to talk openly with leaders about what “good leadership” means. Without those conversations, they might think it means making the sales numbers and meeting aggressive work deadlines, being knowledgeable when people come to them for help, or staying within budget.

Those things are all important, but “good leadership” requires much more. Just staying competent isn’t enough. The trend report below shows 16 ways leadership expectations are increasing.

Leaders are stretching to deal with catastrophic levels of change, increasing ethical expectations and information overload. Taking responsibility at the highest levels (even when it’s difficult) separates “good leaders” from the rest. 

“Good Leadership” Means Taking Responsibility:

 

For thinking beyond ourselves to our impact on others

  1. Staying competent – ethically, professionally, personally and in our leadership
  2. Asking how we can improve
  3. Improving how we lead based on our proactive learning and their suggestions
  4. Never thinking our learning journey is finished

For serving as positive ethical role models

  1. Modeling ethics, building trust, enabling the success of others.
  2. Thinking past our own costs and benefits to consider the costs and benefits to others when making decisions
  3. Demonstrating precaution, care and service
  4. Seeing our impact as global

For improving society

  1. Volunteering, helping
  2. Making community life better
  3. Making life better for future generations

For ethical intent and impact

  1. Making sure that our intent is positive – asking ourselves if we have thought past personal gain, ego and power and plan to do something that is positive and mutually beneficial
  2. Making sure that our impact is positive – taking precautions to ensure that our actions will not unintentionally cause harm

For open dialog about ethics

  1. Asking hard questions
  2. Creating a safe space for dialogue (not monologue)
  3. Answering tough questions about ethical “grey areas”
  4. Making ethical behavior a non-negotiable requirement

All leaders need to know that “good leadership” requires responsibility. If we make “taking responsibility” a priority in our leadership, we can do well by doing good works in our organizations and in our world. If we don’t, we’re taking a seat away from someone who cares and is willing to make a positive difference.

Learn about how to apply all 7 Lenses of Ethical Leadership (chapter previews below).

Join me for an ILA Leadership Perspectives Webinar today at 12:00 pm ET.

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

Learn how ethical expectations are increasing, and how to stay ahead of the curve.

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Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

350th Post: A Zoom Lens Won’t Help You See “Good Leadership”

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By Linda Fisher Thornton

Leadership is multifaceted, but leadership books are not often written about that. Many use a “zoom lens” approach to take you very close to one aspect of leadership. This close-up view can be helpful for fine-tuning our leadership skills, but then we may begin to think that this close-up view is all there is to good leadership. 

A zoom lens won’t help you see good leadership – it is multifaceted.

Sometimes, when we zoom in to get a closer look at one aspect of leadership, we look away from the complete picture. If we focus on self-development, we may neglect our interpersonal impact. If we focus on bringing out the best in other people, we may lose sight of our impact on the environment and the community. 

As useful as zoomed-in leadership information is, we need to understand it in the “wide angle” context. As we seek to improve our leadership and our leadership development, we should remember that there is a bigger picture.

Seeing good leadership requires us to step back and see the full context.

We have many constituents, and their expectations are high. They are concerned about our ability to see issues clearly, take responsibility and lead ethically in a broad array of settings and roles. Learning how to balance the needs of all of them at the same time takes a wide-angle view.

This week, look for books and articles that help you balance competing interests and multiple responsibilities – get the complete, uncut picture of good leadership.

Top 100 Leadership Blog

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

Includes how ethical expectations are increasing, and what you can do to stay ahead of the curve.

Click the cover to read a free preview!

 

LeadinginContext.com  

Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

Leaders Influence First By Who They Are

 

Leaders-influence-others (1)

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Ethical leaders are not easily pulled off course – They stay focused on the values that are important in good leadership. They realize that they are influencing others, and they perceive that as both a privilege and a responsibility. They ask themselves, “In my leadership, am I making the path clear for others to follow?” 

Leaders influence first by who they are, and then by what they do.

If we see leadership as only a privilege (and not a responsibility) we may be tempted by personal gain. If we see it as only a responsibility (and not a privilege), we may miss the joys of bringing out the potential of those we lead. 

Because good leadership is centered in positive values, leaders influence others first by who they are and then by what they do. They do not need to promote themselves as responsible leaders because their actions convey what words cannot.

 

axiombronze

 

 

Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

Includes how ethical expectations are increasing, and what you can do to stay ahead of the curve.

Click the cover to read a free preview!

LeadinginContext.com  

Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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