117 Trends to Watch in 2017

By Linda Fisher Thornton

There are many changes underway that will impact your leadership and your business this year. Adapting to them will require shifts in direction and focus, while staying grounded in positive ethical values. Get settled in with your favorite morning brew and review these trend reports to see what you can expect in the New Year.

117 Trends That Should be on Your Radar in 2017:

The Consumer Sector in 2030: Trends and Questions to Consider, McKinsey & Company

10 Workplace Trends You’ll See in 2017, Forbes.com

7 Leadership Development Trends, Forum

5 Consumer Trends for 2017,Trendwatching.com

Health and Wellness the Trillion Dollar Industry in 2017: Key Research Highlights, Euromonitor International

26 Disruptive Tech Trends For the Rest of the Decade, Brian Solis

Future State 2030: The Global Megatrends Shaping Governments, KPMG.com

The four key consumer trends for 2017, BlueNotes, anz.com

7 Technology Trends That Will Dominate 2017, Forbes.com

The Future of Luxury: Five Trends Reshaping Luxury Consumerism in 2017 and Beyond, Trendwatching.com

5 Digital Marketing Trends in 2017 You Need to Prepare for Now, IBM THINKMarketing

10 HR Trnds You Will See in 2017, Successories.com

As we approach 2017, be sure your leadership team is ready for what’s ahead.


Learn how to adapt your leadership to global trends: Read 7 Lenses (preview below).

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

Includes case examples and questions.

Click the book cover for a preview.

 

 

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Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

Prevention or Cure? Your Choice

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By Linda Fisher Thornton

Senior leadership teams and boards have a choice. In their ethics strategies, they can focus on either prevention or cure.

The cure approach is reactive and messy. You do the bare minimum required by law, wait for something bad to happen, and scramble to do damage control. Then you build an ethical support system (perhaps at the insistence of a regulatory body) to prevent it from happening again.

The prevention approach is proactive and positive, and it helps prevent those messy problems. You build the ethical support system up front, while things are going well.

Taking the “cure” approach seems easier when everything is going well, but all it takes is one highly visible mistake to pull the organization down in every way (in the media, in the stock market, in the eyes of customers, employees and partners…).

Here’s the most interesting thing I’ve discovered – Both the prevention and cure approaches require building an infrastructure that supports ethics in the organization. In the cure approach you choose to do it in the public eye, possibly under court supervision, while bleeding profusely from taking a hit to your credibility. In the prevention approach, you choose to do it now to prevent bleeding profusely in the future. 

Why should we choose prevention? It’s positive. Leading with positive ethical values builds trust and brings out the best in people, which brings out the best in the organization, which leads to great results. The cure approach leads to negative front page headlines, a tarnished reputation and poor organizational results. 

Prevention or Cure? Your Choice.

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

Learn how ethical expectations are increasing, and what you can do to stay ahead of the curve.  

Click the cover to read a free preview!

 

LeadinginContext.com  

Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

 

 

5 Signs Your Culture is FAILING

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By Linda Fisher Thornton

Building a positive ethical culture is a long-term process. It involves much more than just company trappings and perks – leaders must make a commitment to people and to creating a positive work space. When things seem to be going well, it’s easy to miss signs that the culture may be off track.

Mistakes slow our culture building progress, and we may lose ground if they are not fixed quickly. Have you seen signs of any of these culture-eroding problems in your organization?

5 Signs Your Culture is FAILING

  1. Closed (Lack of Transparency, One-Way Communication)
  2. Behind the Times (Failing to Stay Competent, Not Adapting to Change)
  3. Aiming For Minimum Standards (Focusing On Laws Instead of Values))
  4. Toxic (Allowing Teasing, Bullying and Other Negative Behaviors)
  5. Loose (Performance Standards and Values Are Not Enforced)

If you see culture warning signs like these, address them quickly. If left unchecked, they unravel the fabric of the culture, leaving holes that can lead to ethical problems.

Top 100 Leadership Blog

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

Click the cover to read a free preview!

 

 

LeadinginContext.com  

Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

 

 

The Triple Bottom Line Is Just The Beginning

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Many organizations are still talking about the triple bottom line (Profits, People, Planet) as if it’s the gold standard for ethical business. 

While it’s a great improvement over focusing on profit alone, the triple bottom line doesn’t reflect the current expectations of customers, employees and global markets. 

Business leaders are expected to think beyond simple profits (how they benefit) to consider what happens to their many stakeholders. The Profit, People, Planet concept, a popular construct for understanding ethical business, doesn’t cover all of the bases.

For example, the Triple Bottom Line model excludes:

  • honoring laws and regulations
  • demonstrating moral awareness, character and integrity
  • contributing to communities, and 
  • working to ensure a good life for future generations

In the book 7 Lenses, I propose a model for talking about ethical leadership that goes well beyond the Triple Bottom Line to include seven different aspects of responsible business leadership. 

When we look at ethical dilemmas using all 7 Lenses, we get a kaleidoscopic view of what it means to be a responsible leader in a global society. If you want to understand how well you and your organization are leading, don’t stop at the Triple Bottom Line. Take a look through all 7 Lenses.

Yes, Profit, People and Planet are included in the 7 Lenses. But there’s much more to consider. Let’s stop talking about just three parts of ethical responsibility, and let’s talk about the whole picture.

 

Top 100 Leadership Blog

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

Includes case examples and questions.

Click the Book Cover For a Preview!

 

 

LeadinginContext.com  

Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

Reader Question: Why Did You Include Profit as One of the 7 Lenses?

7 Lenses

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Recently, a 7 Lenses reader told me she loved my leadership book but she had one question – “Why did I include Profit in the 7 Lenses?”  

This is a question that has come up before, so I will answer it in today’s post.

Profit is Included in the 7 Lenses® of Ethical Responsibility Because:

 

  • I wanted to help leaders get past thinking that profit and proactive ethics are mutually exclusive.

 

  • I wanted to help leaders move beyond the Triple Bottom Line (Profit-People-Planet) which many people have mistakenly interpreted as the full scope of ethical business responsibility.

 

  • I wanted to help leaders realize that Integrity, Profitability, Sustainability and Community Service can be accomplished simultaneously.

 

  • I wanted leaders to see all the dimensions of ethical responsibility that they would be missing if they stopped after considering profit alone. 

The question about profit’s place in ethical leadership is a good one. At its best, ethics requires setting aside concerns about money and personal gain and doing what is best for others.

But business leaders also have to keep their organizations afloat, and that requires thinking about money.

Have you read 7 Lenses yet? What are your thoughts about its holistic approach to balancing ethics and profit?

 

 

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

 

 

 

 

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Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2015 Leading in Context LLC

 

 

 

 

 

5 Things It’s Safe to Say To An Ethical Leader

By Linda Fisher Thornton

5 Leaf Clover

St. Patrick’s Day is coming up, and today I offer some food for thought (with a 5-leaf clover thrown in).

You would need the 5-leaf clover pictured above to keep you out of trouble if you were to say these things to someone without strong ethical leadership. But these 5 things are pretty safe to say to an ethical leader.

5 Things It’s Safe to Say to An Ethical Leader

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1. Just be yourself.

2. Do whatever it takes to get the job done.

3. Take whatever you need.

4. Let me know what I can do to help.

5. Do what you think is right.

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Ethical leaders have their own internal moral compass and an awareness of the ethical impact of their choices. You can trust them to make decisions that honor people, laws, the environment and workplace boundaries. When you tell them to “just be themselves” or “do what you think is right” you can be confident that they will consider the ethical impact of their behavior and make responsible choices.

What would you add to this list?

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For more, see Linda’s book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014  Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2013 Leading in Context LLC 

 

10 Thinking Traps (That Ethical Leaders Avoid)

Avoid These 10 Thinking Traps

What are some of the thinking traps that we fall into as leaders? I’m not referring to “correlation versus causation” and other logical reasoning problems. There are some common ways of thinking about business leadership that cripple our effectiveness and undermine our ethics. These misconceptions should have important names that reflect the wide swath of negative impact that they cause in organizations.

Here are 10 types of flawed leadership thinking that I have seen, with my own tongue-in-cheek descriptive names for them…

The message? Ethical leaders avoid these 10 types of flawed thinking.

Which one of these is your favorite? My favorite is #10.

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For more, see Linda’s book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014 Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2012 Leading in Context LLC 

What is Conscious Capitalism?

By Linda Fisher Thornton

What is Conscious Capitalism?

In last week’s post, I explored how Ethics Means Acting Beyond Self Interest. This week, I’ll explore the same question at the organizational level.

What are an organization’s ethical responsibilities? How is conscious capitalism a way to understand them?

Ethical Leadership is to the Moral Leader as Conscious Capitalism is to the Moral Company 

While ethical leadership is the term we use to describe what a moral leader does, conscious capitalism is a term that describes what a moral company does. According to BBC News E-Cyclopedia, “conscious capitalism stands for a more moral approach to what is often seen as ‘the dirty business of business.’” (Cited in Conscious Capitalism: Dirty Business No More by Ramla at NextbyRamla.Blogspot.com)

Conscious capitalism involves thinking beyond self-interests, demonstrating care for stakeholders at the global level, using a long-term time orientation and seeing the company’s role in the world through a systems view.

Taking A Systems View on the Moral Responsibilities of Business

According to Anne Federwisch,  Markkula Center for Applied Ethics, Santa Clara University in Corporate Moral Responsibility and The Ethics of Product Usage … the idea of moral responsibility has been expanding over the years.”  While businesses that followed laws used to be considered “good,” there is now so much more that they need to do in order to be considered an ethical business.

According to John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods, quoted in A Case for Conscious Capitalism: Conscious Leadership Through the Lens of Brain Science, by Pillay and Sisodia in the Ivey Business Journal, “Conscious Capitalism is a philosophy of doing business that incorporates the principles of higher purpose (beyond profit maximization), stakeholder interdependence (rather than shareholder centricity), conscious leadership (instead of command-and-control or “carrots and sticks”) and conscious culture (in place of bottom-line obsession).”

When we lead with conscious capitalism, we assume responsibility for our impact on global markets and quality of life in addition to our impact on local communities.

“Conscious Capitalism stresses the importance of viewing stakeholders as interconnected and interdependent. All stakeholders – employees, customers, suppliers, investors, and community members – are regarded as important in their own right (not just as a means to better business results).”

“Conscious Capitalism® is a philosophy based on the belief that a more complex form of capitalism is emerging that holds the potential for enhancing corporate performance while simultaneously continuing to advance the quality of life for billions of people. The conscious capitalism movement challenges business leaders to rethink why their organizations exist and to acknowledge their companies’ roles in the interdependent global marketplace. ”

What is Conscious Capitalism? Conscious Capitalism, Inc., consciouscapitalism.org

In conscious capitalism, we don’t have to choose between caring about our business and caring about society. In an interview with Tom Palmer of Atlas Network, John Mackey explained that:

“A false dichotomy is often set up between self-interest, or selfishness, and altruism. To me it is a false dichotomy, because we’re obviously both. We are self-interested, but we’re not just self-interested. We also care about other people. We usually care a great deal about the well being of our families. We usually care about our communities and the larger society that we live in. We can also care about the well being of animals and our larger environment. We have ideals that motivate us to try to make the world a better place… I think that capitalism and business should fully reflect the complexity of human nature.”

What are the Benefits of Conscious Capitalism?

What are the benefits of thinking about and implementing business in a conscious way? How does conscious capitalism help businesses succeed in the global marketplace?

While conscious capitalism benefits people and communities, there are also clear benefits for the businesses that embrace this philosophy, including:

1. Better Financial Performance

“The pragmatic value of conscious capitalism is underscored by the fact that companies that adhere to these principles outperformed the market by a 9 to 1 ratio over a 10 year period.”

A Case for Conscious Capitalism: Conscious Leadership Through the Lens of Brain Science, by Pillay and Sisodia in the Ivey Business Journal

2. Relationships and Synergies for the Long Term

He (co-CEO John Mackey, Whole Foods) also spoke about the virtues of being generous with vendors, noting that cultivating strong relationships with suppliers pays off when times become difficult. “Business is not a zero-sum game,” he said. “It is in fact all about deriving value from synergies.”

Mark Hamstra, Whole Foods Cites Benefits of Conscious Capitalism, supermarketnews.com

“Another result is long-term trusted relationships with suppliers, consistent with The Integrity Chain, which is more profitable for both parties.”

4 Tenets of Conscious Capitalism, ctsmithiii.wordpress.com

3. Stakeholder and Employee Engagement

“A compelling sense of purpose can create a high level of engagement by the stakeholders and generate tremendous organizational energy.”

Mark Hamstra, Whole Foods Cites Benefits of Conscious Capitalism, supermarketnews.com

“The result of this is empowered employees who we know work harder, are more creative, care more and are responsible for driving greater customer experiences.”

CTSmithIII, 4 Tenets of Conscious Capitalism, ctsmithiii.wordpress.com

4. Shared Meaning and Purpose

“I’m absolutely confident that practicing the principles of Conscious Capitalism brings both a deeper sense of meaning and purpose to your employees (and customers), as well as higher financial returns in the long run. It provides an authentic context to the “story of us,” the fact that business is about relationships, about creating value and not extracting value from those relationships.”

Doug Rauch, former President of Trader Joes and CEO of Conscious Capitalism, Inc.  quoted in Conscious Capitalists Share Their Smarts, monkeydish.com

5. Increased Innovation and Trust

“The benefits far outweigh this challenge. Employee morale and engagement increase, innovation flourishes and the principles of your brand relationship with consumers, namely trust, is reinforced by living core values that align with your consumers’ own values. We feel a remarkable sense of duty and accomplishment in building a better business model and caring today for seven generations of tomorrow.”

 John Replogle, President and CEO of Seventh Generation, quoted in Conscious Capitalists Share Their Smarts, monkeydish.com

 Doing “Good” Is Its Own Reward

Conscious capitalism is the view that we, as business leaders, can make money and make the world a better place at the same time. This is not an unrealistic dream – this is a new way of leading that an increasing number of companies are choosing. And those leaders choosing conscious capitalism are finding out that the old saying is true – that doing “good” is its own reward.

Questions for Discussion:

1. Are we leading in ways that make us part of the global conscious capitalism movement?

2. In what ways do we enhance lives and communities in the course of our business?

3. How could we better demonstrate systems thinking and a long-term view?

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How Not to Lead Through Conflict

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Why We Need Conflict

Why do we tend to think that conflict is something negative, something that we must prevent and avoid?  Unhealthy conflict can tear a team apart, but healthy disagreement is necessary for responsible business.

This post explores what can happen when we discourage respectful disagreements. As you read each scenario, imagine the ethical implications.

Squelching Important Input

Experienced leaders have learned that too little conflict in meetings is a warning sign that not all of the important points are being heard.

In her book Fierce Conversations, Susan Scott describes “The Corporate Nod” as a situation where it’s “unnaturally quiet” and “people don’t say what they are really thinking.” She describes highly skilled, responsible employees helplessly nodding in agreement as the leader demands their support for a project that they have real concerns about.

What can happen when we discourage speaking up? Aren’t we taking a huge risk that we will make an unethical decision? What if our team members see the problem and we don’t, and what if we don’t listen to them?

Killing Employe Engagement

People want to be engaged in meaningful work. It brings out their best. And there is another important benefit of employee engagement – “Engaged employees reduce ethics risk” according to The Ethics Resource Center and the Hay Group in their Supplemental Research Brief, 2009 National Business Ethics Survey: Employee Engagement.

When we squelch input from employees, and they feel strongly about issues they cannot weigh in on, we will lose their engagement in their work. Disengaged employees go through the motions of getting their work done, but feel undervalued, underutilized and unappreciated.

What can happen when people are not listened to, and they disengage from their work? Will they be as motivated to protect your company’s reputation? Will they report problems? Will they make ethical decisions or take the easier, less ethical path?

Allowing Personal Attacks

Mark Gerzon, in his book, Leading Through Conflict, says that “In many settings, debate is disintegrating into little more than verbal brawling in coats and ties.” This kind of conflict is damaging to companies. It leads to a toxic workplace, where it is hard to get work done and employees do not feel safe.

What can happen when we allow employees to personally attack each other? When we allow personal attacks, we are also allowing disrespect. When we allow disrespect, we send a message that “anything goes” in making a point. When we send the message that “anything goes in making a point” aren’t we encouraging unethical behavior? How much of a stretch is it  from verbally attacking a coworker to other unethical interpersonal behaviors like bullying?

Leading through conflict does not mean squelching important input, killing employee engagement or allowing personal attacks. Instead, it involves:

  • clear ground rules
  • an openness to learning
  • a respect for differences
  • a commitment to listen even when it’s bad news
  • giving up the need to be  “right” and being willing to listen to other points of view
  • a focus on collaboration
  • accountability for respectful behavior

Was your last meeting too quiet? It’s worth taking the extra time to be sure that people are heard. Encourage everyone to participate so that you can get the benefit of their experience. Fostering open communication, even when there’s bad news, is part of building an ethical culture.

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For more, see new book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014 Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2012 Leading in Context LLC 

Leadership and…the Cascade Stress Effect

 

 

 

The Toxic Stress of Controlling Leadership

If we use fear-based leadership, bullying, command-and-control leadership, belittling, sabotage or other forms of psychological violence, or allow them to be used by others in our organizations, we create the opposite of a supportive, productive learning organization. We create an environment of toxic stress that harms people and the organization.

Controlling leadership behaviors set off a cascade effect in organizations that looks like this:

  • We create a toxic, constantly stressful environment
  • which reduces people’s ability to learn and remember
  • and think creatively.
  • We get fear-based compliance
  • without engagement
  • which leaves people not doing their best work.
  • We get a low-trust culture
  • which leads to
  • people spending time worrying
  • individually and in groups.
  • We get poor individual
  • and group performance
  • and poor business outcomes.
  • We reduce the capacity of the business
  • to accomplish its mission
  • through people.
Detailed research about the impact of stress on health, the brain, learning, memory and performance may be found at many websites including the following:
Articles explaining the negative effects of controlling leadership on the organization include:

Center for Creative Leadership white paper exploring the impact of workplace stress on leaders: StressofLeadership.pdf

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For more, see Linda’s book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?
 
  7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
  2014 Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
  About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2011 Leading in Context LLC 

Sustainable Everything: What C-Suite Leaders Need to Know About the New Thinking


The Sustainability Mindset Crosses Industries and Disciplines

The growing sustainability mindset is not industry-specific or topic-specific. It is showing up in industries as diverse as foods, construction and social media. It reflects a concern for reducing the use of new materials, and for limiting long-term impact on the environment.

In an interconnected global economy, people are becoming more and more "Leading Ethically" "Ethical Leadership" "Context"aware of the impact of business greed, overconsumption and pollution on our health and well-being. They are scaling back and choosing more responsibly when they do buy.

While some industries are tending to dismiss this change in consumer behavior as a trend that will pass, others have realized that the movement is deeply rooted and that they will be at a competitive disadvantage if they don’t respond.

Sustainable Business Leadership and Integrity

People who are leading a business that is becoming more sustainable are presumably also working toward living sustainably. Making day-to-day changes and achieving a sustainability mindset is a challenging leadership responsibility and involves continuous learning and improvement (See Sustainability is a Mindset, Not a Job).

Broadly, the sustainable movement involves thinking longer-term and being more careful to avoid unintended consequences and harm (See  Five Unintended Consequences of Linear Problem-Solving).  Here is a sampling of the sustainability trends. Feel free to comment to share other sustainability trends not listed here.

Sustainable Living                         Sustainable Business

Sustainable Development          Sustainable Energy

Sustainable Design                        Sustainable Construction

Sustainable Foods                         Sustainable Health

Sustainable Social Media            Sustainable Consumption

Blogcatalog.com Listings for Sustainable

Questions to Consider

1. How can I adapt my business practices to meet the new consumer’s need for sustainable everything?

2. How can my company become an industry leader and set an example for others to follow?

3. Sustainable practices are now considered the standard mode for many of today’s consumers. Thinking ahead, are we making changes as quickly as we need to? Are we staying competitive?

 

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For more, see Linda’s book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?
 
  7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
  2014 Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
  About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2010 Leading in Context LLC 

Ethical Office Supplies:Ethical Product Rankings Make Comparisons Easier

Are You Using Ethical Office Supplies? 

The products you choose can help define you as an ethical business. It is becoming easier to choose ethical office products using websites that rank product ethics.

The Good Office Guide 2008 – This guide includes detailed ethics ratings for companies that sell office equipment and supplies, and a guide to how to choose ethical office products.

The Good Guide – This guide gives ethical ratings for soaps, snacks and other general supplies.

There’s no longer any reason to purchase blindly based on the quality of the advertising. Ethics scoring helps you choose the most ethical product available in the price range that you have chosen.

 

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For more, see Linda’s book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?
 
  7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
  2014 Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
  About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2010 Leading in Context LLC 

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