Context Matters: What We’re Learning About Food

By Linda Fisher Thornton

New research is turning conventional wisdom about healthy eating inside out. This new research radically changes the way we think about nutrition and wellness and will completely change “best practices” in food-related industries. Here is a sneak preview:

WHOLE FOODS (WITH THE FAT) TEND TO HAVE MORE FIBER AND A LOWER GLYCEMIC INDEX 

“Fat and fiber tend to lower the GI of a food. As a general rule, the more cooked or processed a food, the higher the GI; however, this is not always true.”

Glycemic Index and Diabetes, American Diabetes Association

The reason it’s called “whole milk” has less to do with its fat content, than the fact that it’s comparatively unadulterated.

Roberto Ferdman, The whole truth about “whole milk”, The Washington Post

FOOD COMBINATIONS, LEVEL OF PROCESSING AND BRAIN RESPONSE ARE ALL IMPORTANT 

“Processed foods have an altered food matrix, which impacts their bioavailability.”

Hiip.com, What is the Food Matrix?

“Foods high in fat and carbohydrate are, calorie for calorie, valued more than foods containing only fat or carbohydrate and that this effect is associated with greater recruitment of central reward circuits.”

Supra-Additive Effects of Combining Fat and Carbohydrate on Food Reward, Cell Metabolism

INDIVIDUAL NUTRIENTS DON’T TELL THE WHOLE STORY

“The food matrix may exhibit a different relation with health indicators compared to single nutrients studied in isolation.”

Thorning et al., “Whole dairy matrix or single nutrients in assessment of health effects: current evidence and knowledge gaps,” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Applying the “food matrix” concept we learn that we can’t accurately assess nutritional impact based on breaking down individual nutrients in isolation from the whole. We have to consider what we added and what we left out. In other words, context matters. 

We need to see the whole picture to understand human wellness. Whole foods from nature have complex nutritional combinations and protections built into them that vanish when you strip out the fiber and fat. As Aristotle recognized ages ago (and we’re just now rediscovering) “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.”

Questions For Discussion

  1. How are we already contributing to health and well-being through our food choices?
  2. Where should we adjust our practices to reflect what researchers are learning about the complex food matrix?
  3. What should we stop doing or change to support the long-term health and wellness of our constituents?

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Why Ethical Thinking Matters (Part 5)

By Linda Fisher Thornton

To celebrate 7 Lenses going into its second printing, this is the fifth post in a special series focused on Why Ethical Thinking Matters. In case you missed them, take a look at Why Ethical Thinking Matters (Part 1),  Why Ethical Thinking Matters (Part 2), Why Ethical Thinking Matters (Part 3) and Why Ethical Thinking Matters (Part 4)I’m hoping the strategies shared in this series will give you a fresh perspective on your plans for developing leaders in 2018.

You may already realize that ethical thinking is important, and if you do, I ask you to spread the word. To help you champion the cause in your organizations and on social media, I have included the business case below.

If you ask a room full of leaders to define ethical thinking, you’ll get dozens of different answers. Leaders struggle with increasing complexity and accelerating change and they may think that they know how to use ethical thinking. The problem is that the ethical thinking they have been using for years isn’t helping them now. Our thinking skills don’t just upgrade themselves as if set on “automatic upgrade.” Leaders have to practice struggling through ethical issues at increasingly higher levels of complexity.

Ethical thinking doesn’t just “happen” by itself in a rapidly changing global environment – the landscape is constantly changing and ethical expectations are increasing

As ethical challenges increase, leadership thinking needs to increase accordingly for leaders to keep up. If we use outdated software to run our most critical systems, they won’t be reliable and our business credibility will break down. The same is true for outdated leadership thinking. 

Ethical Awareness is Increasing

Corruption has long been approached with the implicit attitude that it is a victimless crime. This is now changing fast, as it has become impossible to ignore the links between corruption, poverty, conflict, and human rights violations.

Alison Taylor and James Cohen, The future of business ethics: Hyper-transparency and other global trends, FCPA Blog

Ethical Problems Must Be Handled Fast, In Real Time

“The caliber of the decision maker is decisive—especially when an immediate decision must arise from instinct rather than from discussion.”

Kenneth R. Andrews, Managing Uncertainty: Ethics in Practice, HBR

Developing Leaders Supports Employee Engagement

“The third factor in “irresistible” management is leadership development: Organizations with high levels of employee engagement focus on developing great leaders. They invest heavily in management development and ensure that new leaders are given ample support.”

Josh Bersin, Becoming Irresistable: A New Model For Employee Engagement, Deloitte Insights

A New Leadership Algorithm is Required

“The definition of strong leadership is evolving. Several interviews discuss topics relating to updating the leadership algorithm or leadership mindset to enhance the overall capacity.”

Maureen Metcalf, What Top Leaders And Academics Are Thinking About Leadership In 2017, Forbes.com

Pressure on leaders is increasing to make good choices and ethical brand value is a key part of organizational success. A bad choice captured on video can go viral on social media, causing the value of a company to plummet in hours. Don’t let your most critical brand ambassadors and coaches (your leaders) use outdated ethical thinking. 

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18 Quotes To Inspire Leaders in the New Year (Part 2)

By Linda Fisher Thornton

This series includes 18 quotes (linked to posts with leadership guidance) to inspire you and help you develop an ethical leader’s mindset. Part 1 included the first 9. Here are 9 more:

Labels DIVIDE people into groups, and highlight their special nature and interests. Values UNITE people, and highlight shared interests and common concerns. 

Since ethics is multidimensional, our learning and application must be multidimensional.

To accomplish the ideal of considering all stakeholders in even our smallest decisions, we’ll have to do more than just imagine the possibilities. We’ll need to do the work.

It’s ethical values that are the true measure of leaders and organizations.

It is never okay to skip learning because “we are already a leader.”

Great leaders use meaningful connections, shared values and mutual understanding to bring people together. 

Leaders might think that values are self-explanatory but that couldn’t be further from the truth. It’s in the nitty-gritty  application of values that people have deep questions. 

In every situation where we think we have to do what it takes to get our immediate needs met, there is another path we can choose – pursuing a mutually beneficial solution that lasts.

The greatest challenge leaders face is to keep up as the bar continues to be raised.

I wish great things for all of you in 2018! For more articles clarifying leadership, ethics and complexity, visit the Blog Index and consider following the Leading in Context Blog for a new post every week in the New Year.

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5 Elements of a (Proactive) Ethical Workplace

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Last week I wrote about how to prepare for leadership future by staying centered in ethical values. Grounding our work in values is critically important but it’s not enough. There’s much more to being ready for the future of leadership than just staying aligned with positive values. This week I’m sharing a graphic about 5 other variables that need to be in place to build a positive ethical culturethe proper time orientation, focus, response, level and complexity.

5 Elements of the Ethical Workplace REV

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We believe that ethics, integrity and trust are critical to our success.

…But what are we doing to clarify them, to anchor our work to them, to teach our organizations how to apply them?

…Are we doing enough?

 Linda Fisher Thornton Named to Top 100 Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business Behavior 2013

Top 100 Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business For 2013 and 2014

7 Lenses™ Workshops Engage Leaders in Learning:

  • What it really means to lead with “integrity”
  • How to center daily work in ethical values
  • What is means to be morally aware and ethically competent
  • How to lead in ways that bring out the best in others
  • How to use clear ethical thinking and decision-making
  • How to build lasting trust
  • How doing all of the above transforms organizational results

“thought-provoking”       “fresh”         “powerful”        “relevant”

Ethics is not supposed to be boring. Bring it to life with a 7 Lenses™ Workshop or Webinar!

Scheduling Now for 2015:  Info@LeadinginContext.com

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics

2014  Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
@leadingincontxt  @7Lenses  
 
© 2014 Leading in Context LLC 

 

16 Trends Shaping the Future of Ethical Leadership

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Today, I want to share with you the picture of the future that I see, based on a powerful movement toward positive, proactive ethical leadership. As a global community, we are increasingly aware of the impact of our choices on others.  We are more aware of our human connection and our responsibilities to one another. 

There is a trend toward considering our responsibilities broadly, beyond making profits to also making a difference. 

Here is my list of 16 trends shaping the future of ethical leadership. 

As we head into the New Year, let’s help our leaders be ready for this positive, proactive “ethical leadership future.”

16 Trends Shaping the Future of Ethical Leadership

To learn more about the future of ethical leadership, see the “What Ethical Leaders Believe” Manifesto by Linda Fisher Thornton at ChangeThis.com.

 

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For more, see Linda’s book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014  Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2013 Leading in Context LLC 

 

 

 

 

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