Don’t Separate “Ethics” From “Leadership”

Preparing For Ethical Leadership Preparing leaders for ethical leadership is a long-term process. It requires careful thought about the messages we are sending. For example, what message are we sending when we separate ethics training from other leadership training? The Risks of "Separate" Ethics Training I believe that we take an unnecessary risk when we separate ethics training from the rest of a leader's development. When we separate ethics training and leadership training, we may be unintentionally sending the message that ethics is separate from leadership. What could be the harm of separating ethics from leadership?

The Leadership Development Advantage

by Linda Fisher Thornton Developing Leaders Pays Off Ongoing development for leaders helps companies. According to several recent reports, businesses that invest in leadership development enjoy clear advantages. These advantages include improved bench strength, improved talent retention and greater market value over time.

What is Creativity?

What is Creativity? In the leadership development world, creativity is getting a great deal of attention now. But what is it? Can you learn it? Is it a skill? How do we lead in ways that encourage it? This post begins to answer those important leadership questions. When we explore the question "What is creativity?" from a thinking and learning point of view, an open and active mind is clearly required - one that can see new possibilities. But is there more to it than that? This post explores the variables that make up what we think of as "creativity."

Social Media for “Good”

The 5 reasons to engage in social media describe how social media can benefit us as leaders who are learning in complex times, but that's only one dimension of the benefit of connected communication through social media. In this post I'll explore some of the ways social media can be used for "good."

Scholars and Practitioners: Debate or Collaborate?

Scholars and Practitioners Working Together Scholars and practitioners see the world from different perspectives in making ethical leadership practices clear, providing an opportunity for them to learn from one another. It takes both a research focus and a focus on real-world relevance to provide the kind of clarity that today's leaders need.

How to Use the Leading in Context® Website

How to Use The Leading in Context® Website Consider how you want to find information and then click on the link below: ◊ To understand the evolving definition of "leading ethically" in a global society (Review Selected Posts) ◊ To follow my curiosity (Scan the Blog Index for titles that interest you!)

Shared Ethical Values: Global Consensus?

As we struggle day-to-day with what ethics means in business, groups of concerned leaders around the world are studying common ethical values that could clarify ethical behavior and unite us in a common global code of ethics. There are resources readily available that present ethical values in a global context and provide guidance for ethical corporate behavior.

Leadership and… Conventional Wisdom

Sticking to yesterday's conventional wisdom can make us out-of-date, because it helps us ignore any information that contradicts our beliefs. It can lead us to make decisions based on out-of-date ways of thinking, and that may result in missed opportunities or even to bad decisions that can harm others. In this case, even though we do not set out to make bad decisions, the consequences of those decisions are just as real. BE OPEN TO CHANGE, WILLING TO CHANGE AND WILLING TO THINK DIFFERENTLY!

The Ethical Leadership Puzzle: A Broader View

There are companies that are winning categories in one aspect of ethical leadership (CSR, Sustainability, or Human Rights for example) and then being cited for violations in another aspect of ethical leadership (CSR, Sustainability, or Human Rights for example). The fact that it is happening illustrates the point that "ethical leadership" is broader than many companies think it is.

5 Unethical Phrases: Low Trust

How we treat people is an important part of ethical leadership. It is also a critical part of building trust in the organization. These 5 phrases signal that the speaker may not be treating other people in the company respectfully and may not be considering the ideas and concerns of others when making decisions: