Judging and Bullying: Are They Different?

What is Judging? If each person's view is different from the views of others, then what is judging? A limited worldview that only allows the views of one person or group Promoting one's own thinking as the "perfection" of thinking An attempt (intentional or not) to make ourselves look smarter by belittling another person or group An attempt to control the behavior and thinking of others or groups

18 Leading in Context® Resources For Building Ethical Cultures

This week's post offers 18 resources that will make ethical leadership easier to understand and implement in your organization. 17 of the 18 tools are free. The list of resources is organized around questions that you may have about how to build an ethical culture.

The Ethical Leadership Puzzle: A Broader View

There are companies that are winning categories in one aspect of ethical leadership (CSR, Sustainability, or Human Rights for example) and then being cited for violations in another aspect of ethical leadership (CSR, Sustainability, or Human Rights for example). The fact that it is happening illustrates the point that "ethical leadership" is broader than many companies think it is.

Leadership and…Respect: The New Minimum Standard for Workplace Behavior

This is a Themed Post featuring earlier Leading in Context™ Blog Posts about Respect. Each Post illustrates a different way that ethical leaders show respect. Enjoy! Respect is the New Minimum Standard for Workplace Behavior

Ethical Leadership Culture: The Case of the Dissenting Senior Leader

The Impact of the Unethical Senior Leader Take the common case of many organizational leaders trying to create an ethical culture, with one or more of the Senior Leaders not bought in or even blocking their efforts. The distraction, fear and chaos created by an unethical Senior Leader can drain the company of engagement, creativity and productivity. Is blocking a company's efforts to create an ethical culture unethical? You bet. It can be the cause of company failure because of the negative systemic effects that it creates. The systemic effects created by even one Senior Leader leading unethically include loss of trust, loss of employee engagement, loss of customers, lowered productivity, increased complaints, failure of departments to work together, sabotage, blaming, etc... Correct it Quickly When a Senior Leader is operating against the best interests of the company and its stakeholders, the problem needs to be corrected by the other Senior Leaders as quickly as possible. How?

5 Unethical Phrases: Low Trust

How we treat people is an important part of ethical leadership. It is also a critical part of building trust in the organization. These 5 phrases signal that the speaker may not be treating other people in the company respectfully and may not be considering the ideas and concerns of others when making decisions:

Top 10 Trends in Ethical Business Leadership 2010

This is a list of the top 10 trends that I have observed this year that are redefining "ethical leadership." Feel free to post a comment about other ethical business leadership trends you've observed that are moving responsible leadership forward.

Leading in Context LLC Publishes “Ethical Implications of How Leaders Perceive Different” Module

“Ethical Implications of How Leaders perceive Different” is a nine-page eBook designed to enhance leadership development programs by providing a thinking context for ethical leadership. Published by Leading in Context LLC.

Respecting People and Ideas Fuels Business Innovation

To encourage innovation, business leaders need to demonstrate respect for all ideas, regardless of the source. Ideas and emerging trends that some would consider to be "on the fringe" are often important in the next wave of innovative products.

Scrutinize Suppliers for Ethical Business Practices

The ethics of our business includes things that don't happen at headquarters or in any of our sites, but that go into the the making of the final product or service that the customer purchases. Prudent leaders check the ethics of their suppliers and partners.

Case Study: Think Before You Blame (the Culture May be the Cause)

When we are faced with a business problem that involves ethics, the easy way out is to blame someone. That appears to remove the pressure of actually solving the problem. But organizational problems are complicated and rarely have one simple cause.