Ethical Leadership is a “Fear-Free” Zone

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Fear is insidious. It changes how we see the world and how we treat others. Here are 5 important reasons why fear has no place in our workplaces, our families or our communities:

5 Reasons Fear Has No Place in Leadership

  1. Fear creates a dampening field that blocks positive interpersonal behavior including respect and care
  2. Fear-inducing relationships are damaging to human health
  3. When they are fearful, people spend time trying to protect themselves rather than reaching for their potential, and that reduces job satisfaction and productivity
  4. The damaged job satisfaction and productivity that are common in fear-based relationships translate into damaged organizational results
  5. Fear leads to unethical choices about people who are not like us

Fear is the toxic ingredient in many failed leadership strategies. When we’re fearful, we’re not at our best. We’re not thinking clearly. When we’re just trying to protect ourselves, we may quickly “rule out” positive strategies that would help us solve collective problems – including dialogue, cooperation, long-term thinking and listening to understand.

If we think someone or some group is “dangerous” or “harmful,” why would we want to get close enough to understand them?

When we become fearful, we almost automatically shift from considering ourselves and others, to just considering ourselves. We narrow the scope of the respect and care we offer to only those around us who do not elicit our fear response. This kind of reaction is understandable as a natural survival instinct. But is it ethical leadership? No, it’s not.

Great leaders respect others AND differences. If they begin to become fearful of a person or group, they recognize the signs, step back to examine their motives, and shift their thinking. They never compromise respect.

Top 100 Leadership Blog

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Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

Includes case examples and questions.

Click the book cover for a preview.

 

 

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Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

 

5 Questions For Leaders Seeking Insight In The New Year

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By Linda Fisher Thornton

Many thanks to Leading in Context friends and followers for a wonderful 2015.  I appreciate your active involvement in the movement – special thanks to all who shared posts, posted comments and let me know what they wanted to learn more about. I am grateful for the global conversation about the positive leadership we need for a better future.

This New Year, as we head into 2016, I urge you to reach for Insight.

Insight is much deeper than observation, and it can mean a variety of powerful and life-changing things:

  • An understanding of “the inner nature of things” (Wikipedia, Insight)
  • An “aha moment” when things make sense and seem clear
  • Discovering a simple solution to a long-standing problem
  • Achieving a sudden and profound understanding of our own capabilities and challenges
  • Getting a glimpse of who we could be at our very best

Insight is especially important in leadership. Without it, we may cling to outdated notions of the purpose of leadershipWith it, we may inspire many others to do great things.

Insight is especially important now because we are leading in a time of information overload. Without it, we can miss the deeper meaning. With it, we can help others see beyond the flashy messages to the values that matter.

This year, aim high, striving to be a leader who helps others achieve insight and who brings out the best in people, organizations and communities.

Ask Your Team These 5 Questions:

  1. How directly do we contribute to our organization’s mission, and how can we transform our mindset and approach to support it more deeply?
  2. What routine tasks could we automate or eliminate so that we can spend time on what really matters?
  3. How could we help our organization move from a focus on the week or the quarter to a focus on its impact over the next hundred years?
  4. How well are we honoring all 7 Lenses of Ethical Leadership in our decision making and actions? (See this video for an introduction to the 7 Lenses and this Manifesto that explains the thinking process behind the 7 Lenses framework)
  5. What is one thing that we could improve that would take our work to a higher level of positive impact in the organization, the community and the world?

Leaders, make it a priority to reach past the noise and past day-to-day pressures. Seek Insight in 2016.

Top 100 Leadership Blog

axiombronze

 

 

Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

Includes case examples and questions.

 

 

 

LeadinginContext.com   Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2016 Leading in Context LLC

Hitting the High Notes

By Linda Fisher Thornton 

When I was singing with a local chorus many years ago, I took voice lessons. My teacher had me start by singing scales while she listened. After my voice cracked, I explained that I had trouble “hitting the high notes.” I explained that I was an Alto, not a Soprano and the high notes seemed way out of my reach.

Our Thoughts Drive What We Do

Listening to me try to hit those high notes, she encouraged me to stretch to reach them. But over a period of weeks of practice, my ability to reach them didn’t get much better. Then I learned a valuable lesson about how what we think determines what we do. I had a breakthrough when I realized that the piano keyboard visually has no high or low on it. It goes left to right. I started to think about my voice that way, as singing the notes from left to right instead of up and down.

Upgrading Our Mindset

That change in my thinking greatly expanded my singing range and I was no longer struggling to reach the high notes. I have learned through the years that changing our experience can be as simple as changing the way we perceive it. When our mindset changes, our actions follow.

Upgrading Our Leadership

This lesson also applies to how well we adapt our leadership as the world changes. Are we using the mindset of an ethical leader? Are we modeling full inclusion, or do we treat some types of people better than others? Are we placing a priority on our own development, or have we settled into a comfortable zone where we no longer challenge ourselves to learn and grow? 

We should never settle for a limited range and give up on adapting to change

Identify an area in your leadership where you might not be hitting the high notes, and where changing your mindset could make all the difference. 

Top 100 Leadership Blog

axiombronze

 

 

Prepare Your Leaders For Ethical Leadership Future – Help Them Learn To See Through The 7 Lenses®. 

Includes case examples and questions.

 

 

 

LeadinginContext.com   Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership®

©2015 Leading in Context LLC

 

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