What is Ethical Leadership?

By Linda Fisher Thornton

What is ethical leadership? I have been exploring that question on the Leading in Context Blog for the last four years. This week, I’ve chosen some highlights from popular posts to illustrate what leading in a complex world requires of each of us.

Leading ethically in a global society requires much more than following laws and regulations. We must take on a global mindset, maintain an openness to learning, actively build trust, and so much more.

We must move away from a compliance mindset, and reach for a values-based mindset that considers much more (see the highest level on this three-level graphic).

Which of These is Ethical Leadership

Expectations Beyond Compliance and Laws

“Following laws and regulations is just above the punishment threshold for ethical leadership. Expectations are moving to a much higher level, a level at which we are expected to do much more. Look at the third level, the highest level of the graphic. Aren’t transparency, sustainability and honoring human rights now expected of all businesses? I believe they are, and there are other factors we need to consider that are not on this list. The minimum standard is gradually moving to a higher level as we better understand the impact of our choices on others in a global society.”       

Linda Fisher Thornton, Which of These is Ethical Leadership?

Openness to Learning

“When we are not open to learning, we can easily misinterpret another perspective that does not match our own as a threat. That perspective that we are actively arguing against may in fact reflect a more current, more advanced, or more ethical perspective than ours. Failing to acknowledge that there are other perspectives on an issue (and that the people who hold them have a right to their views as much as we do) shows a lack of respect, and a lack of awareness…”

Linda Fisher Thornton, Civility and Openness to Learning

Inclusion

“Managing diversity without inclusion as the ultimate goal can make a big difference in the way employees experience our organization. We choose a way of thinking that represents what we’re trying to do and then build a process/program/structure or measurement based on that foundation. If diversity is our way of thinking, we may get an approach based on “differences,” rather than one based on creating an inclusive culture where a diverse group of people can do their best work.”

Linda Fisher Thornton, Differences or Inclusion: Which Are We Focusing On?

Service and Care

“One of the elements of ethical leadership that may be overlooked when we view ethics using a “legal lens” is supporting and developing the potential of the people we lead. While many leadership ethics programs focus on the risk side of ethics – compliance with laws and regulations, avoiding lawsuits, etc., there is an equally important side of ethics that involves care.” Linda Fisher Thornton, Ethical Leaders Care

A High Trust Environment

“On the surface, it doesn’t seem that curiosity and imagination are related to ethics. But think about what would happen in an environment where people were not able to use them. Could employees still be relied on to consistently behave ethically in an environment where they were not engaged in their work, and where they did not feel respected or fairly treated?”

Linda FIsher Thornton, Curiosity and Imagination Necessary Ingredients in Ethical Business

A Global Mindset

“When we see the world as a global society, we see that we need to act as if what happens to others, even people we may never meet, matters. We all share space, food and natural resources. We also share international communication and transportation systems and a global economy. Thinking about our planet as home to a global society, it is clear that we must act as if what happens to the environment matters. Our survival is dependent on the limited resources we have available and how responsibly we use them.” 

Linda Fisher Thornton, Ethical Leadership and… a Global Society

Honoring Human Rights

“As leaders, we are expected to protect human rights in all that we do. In our quest to lead responsibly, we must continually consider the question “How do we need to change in order to better honor human rights?” If you are in the process of developing a corporate human rights policy, A Guide for Business: How to Develop a Human Rights Policy (UN Human Rights, Global Compact) is helpful in beginning the discussion.”

Linda Fisher Thornton, Honoring Human Rights is Essential

Staying ready to lead ethically in a globally networked world will require continual learning and a broad understanding of what ethical responsibility includes. Let’s get started…

 

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For more, see Linda’s book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014  Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2013 Leading in Context LLC 

Making a Difference in the World

Making a DifferenceBy Linda Fisher Thornton

One Person Can Make A Difference

I believe that there is much more to leadership than going through the daily tasks and assignments on our to-do lists. In my Manifesto about ethical leadership, this is how I defined the importance of leaders making a positive difference:

“We make a difference in the world. We realize that the planet, our communities, and the long-term good of world are also our constituents. We know that our role is to think and act in ways that honor our planet, our communities and our world. We do good without doing harm.”

The Leading in Context® Manifesto

There is More to Leadership

There is much more to leadership than just being at the front of the room during a meeting, or working with the team to make the big decisions. I find that the most rewarding part of leadership is making a difference – in people’s lives, in the community, or in the world. While making a difference may seem like a lofty goal, consider these examples of how much difference one person on a mission can make:

How ‘Difference Makers Think’ — The Single Greatest Secret to Personal and Business Success, David Sturt, Forbes.com

How to Change the World, John-Paul Flintoff, in Utne Reader

I can think of several leaders who changed the course of my life through their support, example and teaching. Today, in your daily leadership, choose to be that kind of leader – the kind who makes a lasting difference.

 

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For more, see Linda’s book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014 Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2013 Leading in Context LLC 

Modeling Ethical Leadership and Behavior

Modeling Ethical Behavior

By Linda Fisher Thornton

As leaders, we are not working in isolation. What we do sets the tone for what employees do. Because we are leading them, they will tend to follow and learn from our choices. What kinds of choices do we need to make to ensure that employees make ethical choices in their daily work? What does it look like when we effectively model ethical leadership?

The Manifesto

“We model ethical leadership and behavior. We realize that we can only bring out the best in those we lead when we embrace continuous learning. We know that our role is to listen, learn and improve, serving as a role model for what ethical behavior looks like. We learn just as much as we teach. We listen deeply to others, not sharing our own thinking without regard to theirs. We model ethical leadership, with our thoughts, words and deeds in full alignment. We are open to learning and model the ethical behavior we ask of others.

The Leading in Context® Manifesto

Modeling Ethical Leadership and Behavior

How important is it to model ethical behavior? Think about the combined impact when everyone you lead follows your example. If your example is positive, then you get abundant ethical behavior. If your example is negative, then you get abundant unethical behavior.

It is simultaneously a burden and an opportunity for us as leaders to model ethical behavior. It is a burden in that we must work hard to ensure that we are modeling the highest ethics. It is an opportunity in that modeling ethical behavior brings out the best in us and those we lead.

A leader’s ethical shortcomings are magnified throughout the organization. However, consider that the same is true for ethical improvements. What could happen if you intentionally worked to improve the ethics of your day-to-day choices? The ripple effect that your improvement would generate would improve the ethics of many others. That’s the magnified impact of ethical modeling.

 

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For more, see new book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014  Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2013 Leading in Context LLC 

 

Ethical Leadership Brings Out the Best in People and Organizations

Leading in Context Website

By Linda Fisher Thornton

After taking the Leading in Context website and branding back to the drawing board, this week I’m delighted to introduce the Leading in Context® Website version 2.0. The new website features:

  • A theme and focus on bringing out the best in leaders and organizations through ethical leadership
  • A new company logo
  • My Manifesto – a compelling statement of my beliefs about responsible leadership, designed to fuel the movement toward intentional and proactive ethical leadership (please pass it on!)
  • An announcement of my new leadership book coming out in paperback and digital versions this fall (more about this soon!)

Why did I do a complete website makeover? I didn’t think that the Leading in Context website adequately conveyed the positive power of ethical leadership. It didn’t place a stake in the ground and say “this is what I believe” and it may not have inspired you to take action… I hope that you will find that the Leading in Context website version 2.0 is a clear call to action.

I strongly believe that ethical leadership brings out the best in people and organizations. I have believed that for many years, and the current research only confirms what many of us have known all along. Ethical leadership is not just a good practice – when consistently applied it also propels people and organizations forward in many positive ways:

  • It releases productivity and energy toward good work
  • It creates the kind of culture where people feel valued and can bring their energy and their best ideas to work
  • It helps leaders and organizations compete and succeed in a crowded global marketplace
  • It appeals to ethically-aware consumers
  • It brings out the best in individuals, and that brings out the best in organizations

Join the movement to Unleash the Positive Power of Ethical Leadership™ 

Read the statement of belief at LeadinginContext.com/Manifesto. Take the intentional journey to becoming the best leader you can be. Inspire your organization to release its potential through ethical leadership. Spread the word.

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For more, see new book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014  Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2013 Leading in Context LLC 

 

How Many Really Great Leaders Have You Worked For?

By Linda Fisher Thornton

How many really great leaders have you worked for?

If we’re very lucky, we will have had the chance to work for great leaders in most of the jobs we’ve held. However, when I ask people how many really great leaders they have had, they usually have to think pretty hard to come up with one or two.

I have been curious about whether or not what I’m hearing is representative of the general population. If we can’t think of more than one or two really great leaders out of the many jobs we’ve held – what does that say about the state of leadership?

So here’s a quick poll. Think back to the great leaders you’ve had in all of the jobs you’ve ever had, starting when you first held a job.  These are leaders who brought out the best in you. They demonstrated the highest ethics.  They made work fun and let you know you were a valuable member of the team. They encouraged individual and team accomplishment and helped you learn from mistakes. They inspired you to do more than you thought you could.

Answer the poll below and let’s see how the numbers really look. After you vote, click “View Results” to see what others are saying.

We should all work toward being the kind of leader that could be counted in this poll as a great one. Here are some questions to guide us on our journey.

What are we doing each day to intentionally be a great leader? 

What more could we do?

How would doing more make a difference in the lives of those we lead?

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For more, see new book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014  Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2013 Leading in Context LLC 

 

 

Cultural Competence Required

Intercultural CompetenceBy Linda Fisher Thornton

Openness to learning about other cultures has become a necessary component of leadership.  One way to help people respect cultural differences is to build what UNESCO calls “intercultural competence.” To accomplish this, we need an open mind, and a willingness to learn from others who do not think or live as we do.

“Intercultural competences are abilities to adeptly navigate complex environments marked by a growing diversity of peoples, cultures and lifestyles.”

Intercultural Competences: Conceptual and Operational Framework, UNESCO, The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, UNESCO.org

If we’re lucky, we’ll have the opportunity to work with people who have very different backgrounds and mindsets from our own. If they’re lucky, we’ll be open-minded and want to learn more about their culture and beliefs to understand them. Ghassan Salame′, Dean of the Paris School of International Affairs, said in his Speech to the United Nations General Assembly that “mistrust, which anthropologists have found in most cultural traditions of the past, is not necessarily higher today; it only has many more opportunities to express itself in these times of multiform interaction.”

When we are not open to learning about other cultures, of course those cultures will seem “wrong” to us.  Stephanie Quapp and Giovanna Cantatore describe such a situation well when they say “Misunderstandings arise when I use my meanings to make sense of your reality.”

“We cannot change anything until we accept it. Condemnation does not liberate, it oppresses.”                                                  Carl Jung

Globally-aware leaders intentionally develop cultural competence. Being open to learning from others builds a bridge that helps us overcome any differences. Judging them simply closes the door.

Resources for Learning:

Intercultural Competences: Conceptual and Operational Framework, UNESCO, The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, UNESCO.org

What is Cultural Awareness? Stephanie Quapp and Giovanna Cantatore

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For more, see new book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014 Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2013 Leading in Context LLC 

 

Compliance With Laws Isn’t Ethical Leadership (There’s More)

12013CWord

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Beyond Compliance

I have intentionally avoided using the C-word (Compliance) in most of my posts, and I decided that it was time to explain why. In this post I’ll explain why laws are not enough, and why complying with laws does not mean that we are leading ethically.

Laws Are Not Enough

Many people equate compliance with ethics. Actually, compliance with laws is the minimum standard and does not adequately represent  “ethical leadership,” which is at a much higher level. Laws are the minimum threshold  – below which people are punished. When we settle for this level of ethics, we are simply working toward staying out of jail – and that is not enough to make us good corporate citizens.

Why is compliance with laws not enough when it comes to leading ethically? What else is there?

Here is an example that illustrates the broader responsibilities that ethical leadership includes. Which of these two views of ethical leadership do you think is the most ethical view?

‘Ethical Business’ Means Making as Much Money as I Can Without Going to Jail

If I tend to think in a win-lose way, then I may be more likely to seek gain for myself without concern for my impact on other stakeholders.

‘Ethical Business’ Includes the Responsibility to Respect and Serve 

If I tend to think in a win-win, service-focused way, then I may be more likely to seek positive solutions for others and consider my responsibilities to them more broadly.

Linda Fisher Thornton, Our Thinking is an Ethical Driver, Leading in Context Blog, December 12, 2012

Clearly, the second example demonstrates a higher level of ethical thinking and a broader sense of responsibility than the first. There are laws that say that I should not attack another person in the workplace. The ethical issues about how I need to treat others are at a much higher level than just restraint from physical violence. They include the need to respect others, demonstrate care and concern for them, and treat them with civility.

Learning Beyond Compliance 

Why don’t laws (that represent the “punishment threshold”) represent ethical leadership? Settling for compliance with laws might mean that we would not physically attack each other, but we may still be disrespectful in ways that erode trust and affect the well-being of employees, customers and other stakeholders.

If we focus just on compliance in our ethics training for leaders, we are aiming too low and we will always be scrambling to catch up as laws change. How can we move beyond just complying with laws (the minimum standard) to leading ethically in organizations (optimal)? These posts provide some guidance:

Developing Globally Responsible Leaders        Ethical Leadership Context

Developing the Ethical Leader of the Future

Instead of focusing on teaching leaders how to stay out of jail, let’s focus on teaching leaders what we want – the optimal level of ethical leadership.

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For more, see Linda’s book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014  Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2013 Leading in Context LLC 

 

10 Thinking Traps (That Ethical Leaders Avoid)

Avoid These 10 Thinking Traps

What are some of the thinking traps that we fall into as leaders? I’m not referring to “correlation versus causation” and other logical reasoning problems. There are some common ways of thinking about business leadership that cripple our effectiveness and undermine our ethics. These misconceptions should have important names that reflect the wide swath of negative impact that they cause in organizations.

Here are 10 types of flawed leadership thinking that I have seen, with my own tongue-in-cheek descriptive names for them…

The message? Ethical leaders avoid these 10 types of flawed thinking.

Which one of these is your favorite? My favorite is #10.

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For more, see Linda’s book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014 Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2012 Leading in Context LLC 

Differences or Inclusion – Which Are We Focusing On?

by Linda Fisher Thornton

A Diversity Focus Can Be Divisive

When we talk about diversity, we are noticing differences. That may not seem like a profound statement at first, but think about it for a moment. In a work environment, diversity is about having different types of employees, right? And that’s a good thing for productivity and innovation, isn’t it? It is a good thing. But it’s not enough.  

Managing diversity without inclusion as the ultimate goal can make a big difference in the way employees experience our organization. We choose a way of thinking that represents what we’re trying to do and then build a process/program/structure or measurement based on that foundation. If diversity is our way of thinking, we may get an approach based on “differences,” rather than one based on creating an inclusive culture where a diverse group of people can do their best work.

How we Perceive “Different” Has Ethical and Organizational Implications

“There are a number of ways to perceive people who are different from us and ideas that are different from ours. Some are more positive and productive than others” (Linda Fisher Thornton, “Ethical Implications of How Leaders Perceive ‘Different'”).”

As leaders, how we choose to handle people who are “different” from us in some way shapes our organizational culture in important ways. Tamara Erickson, McKinsey award-winning author, calls for a higher level of diversity understanding in organizations:

“There is a third stage of diversity, perhaps aspirational for most today, represented by a fundamental shift in attitudes toward people who are in any way different… My wish for 2011 is that more organizations will include programs aimed to reach this stage as an important component of their diversity goals.”

Tamara J. Erickson in Level Three Diversity: Moving Beyond Political Correctness,” Diversity Executive, January/February 2011

As leaders, we need to understand our choices and the potential ethical impact of those choices on our employees and our organizations. Honoring human rights fundamentally means honoring everyone, regardless of background or perspective. Are we living that every day in our organizational leadership?

In Inclusive Organizations, Differences are Seen as Enhancing Organizational Innovation

The excerpt below is from Leading in Context® Training Module “Ethical Implications of How Leaders Perceive Different” which provides a framework for thinking and talking about how we handle “different” in our organizations.

Perceptions of “Different” Impact Our Behavior

“How we think as leaders directly impacts our leadership behavior.  It compels us to act and to make decisions in the context of the value judgments we make.”

“Unfortunately, we don’t always use the word “different” to describe things and people and ideas that are new to us. We often use less friendly words that indicate that the person or idea is wrong, misguided or harmful. When we are perceiving “different” as wrong, misguided or harmful, we are more likely to treat people in ways that are not respectful. When we are open to hearing “different” perspectives we are more likely to lead in responsible, inclusive ways.”

“Because our thinking process shapes our decisions, as leaders we must be careful to use thinking processes that are inclusive and that respect the rights of other people to have their own perspectives and opinions.”

Excerpts from “Ethical Implications of How Leaders Perceive Different” by Linda Fisher Thornton

As Howard Winters said, “Civilization is the process in which one gradually increases the number of people included in the term ‘we’ or ‘us’ and at the same time decreases those labeled ‘you’ or ‘them’ until that category has no one left in it.”

“The ‘different’ perspectives and opinions of those we lead do not undermine our leadership position. In fact, it is those new ideas and perspectives that will help us keep our company adaptable, engaging and competitive in a global marketplace.”  (Linda Fisher Thornton, “Ethical Implications of How Leaders Perceive ‘Different'”).

At its highest level, inclusion is about honoring human rights. Consider whether you are managing diversity or working toward full inclusion in a way that respects human rights. These resources will help you explore the differences between leading with a diversity-based approach and leading for full inclusion.

Resources for Moving From Differences to Inclusion

ILR Impact Brief: Diversity and Inclusion: Is There Really a Difference? Cornell University, ilr.cornell.edu

The Netter Principles, glaxdiversitycouncil.com

A Framework for Building Organizational Inclusion, Working Paper Number 2, Bormann and Woods, The Workplace Diversity Network, Cornell University, ilr.cornell.edu

What is Inclusion? Inclusion Network, Inclusion.com

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For more, see Linda’s book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014 Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2012 Leading in Context LLC 

150th Blog Post – Learning Out Loud

By Linda Fisher Thornton

Humble Blog Beginnings

The journey to a 150th blog post starts with a single post.

This ethical leadership blog had a very humble beginning back in 2009. I had decided to start a blog and took a WordPress class at the University of Richmond.  The possibilities were promising.

Then came those nagging thoughts…

  • what should I write about?
  • who will read it?
  • what if I make a mistake?
  • what if it’s not good enough?
Other bloggers may be able to relate to these initial thoughts.
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Finding the Courage to Learn Out Loud
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My doubts were powerful, but I had decided to do it, so I gathered the courage to post something on my new blog, found a link to share and composed a draft! It was May of 2009.
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After posting the very simple link, I expected that the sky would fall in. Why in the world would I have any business blogging? I’d been writing corporate training materials for over 25 years, I’d been writing articles and teaching, but blogging felt different – more raw, more personal, more exposed somehow… way out of my comfort zone. I was thoroughly amazed when a week went by and nothing bad happened.  So I started working on another short post. Most of the early posts on this blog were just links to good resources for leadership developers and human resource managers.
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It was 6 months later in November when I learned how to upload an image to go with the post (and the first image was pretty dismal).  To see the progression yourself, here is the Leading in Context Blog Index, with the oldest posts listed at the bottom.
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Being Transformed
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Since the humble beginnings of this blog in 2009, I have grown into being comfortable with learning out loud.  The journey has transformed me. This work,  helping leaders understand what it means to lead ethically in a complex world, has become my life’s work.
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Over time I have found the courage to question and explore the meaning of ethical leadership out loud. With time and practice, I have learned to express that meaning more clearly.
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Yes, now I can own it – in addition to being a leadership development consultant, publisher, teacher, facilitator and speaker, I have learned my way through and now I am an ethical leadership blogger.
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Special thanks to all the people who have encouraged me, shared resources, connected, followed, retweeted, commented and otherwise engaged in learning around the important issues that this blog explores. Thanks also to those who disagreed with me at times. You helped me grow as well.
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The journey to a 150th Blog Post starts with a single post and the courage to learn out loud.
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What are you waiting to do? What’s stopping you?

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For more, see new book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014  Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2012 Leading in Context LLC 

Leading Ethically Through Complexity: How to Prepare Leaders

The Leader of the Future
In response to the post “Business Leader Future: A Sketch” Graham posted a question about how we can support leaders who are learning to lead in the ways described in that post. It seemed difficult for some readers to imagine a single leader being able to handle complexity so responsibly in a fast-paced global business arena.  One reader described the leader in the sketch as a “saint.”
·
How to Help Leaders Prepare to Handle Complexity
I spent some time thinking about what Senior Leaders and leadership development professionals can do to be sure that their leaders are learning the kind of leadership that is in such high demand now, and will be essential for success in the future.
My list of “10 Practical Ways to Help Leaders Lead Ethically Through Complexity” is below. What would you add?
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10 Practical Ways to Help Leaders Lead Ethically Through Complexity
1.   Help them learn to embrace complexity
2.   Help them learn to respect others
3.   Help them learn to respect differences
4.   Help them learn to respect the environment
5.   Help them understand global trends
6.   Help them understand their ethical responsibilities
7.   Help them learn to think like a global leader
8.   Help them understand the importance of learning and adapting
9.   Help them understand the importance of service to others and society
10. Help them embrace social media and socially connected learning

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For more, see new book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014 Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2012 Leading in Context LLC 

100 Leadership and Ethics Blogs 2012

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“Don’t focus on having a great blog. Focus on producing a blog that’s great for your readers.”
(Brian Clark) quoted in 50 Thoughtful, Funny and Polemic Blogging Quotes
 

Looking for Leadership Blogs?

This collection of blog lists provides links that will lead you to hundreds of blogs about leadership, management and ethics. Understandably, some of the lists will overlap, since each blog list creator selects blogs based on different factors.

Jurgen Appelo lists the Top 150 Management and Leadership Blogs.

Nicole White lists The Top 100 Leadership Blogs at bestuniversities.com.

Stephenslighthouse.com has selected The 50 Best Blogs For Future Leaders

Blogrank’s Top 50 Leadership Blogs sorts them by many different variables – number of unique visitors, RSS subscribers, etc.,

The Blogbridge Top 100 Blogs includes leadership topics.

Looking for Ethics Blogs?

OnlineMBAGuide.net lists its 50 Best Business Ethics Blogs.

The GRC Blog Roundup: Best Business Ethics Blogs and Ethical Issues at Vivimind at corporatecomplianceinsights.com includes more.

The World Watchdogs: Top 50 Human Rights Blogs is online at criminaljusticeusa.com.

There’s a Best Green Blogs Directory at bestgreenblogs.com.

Post Your Favorites! 

Feel free to share your favorite leadership and ethics blog directories. Submit your comment below!

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For more, see new book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014 Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

© 2012 Leading in Context LLC 

Thinking Ethically: 5 Sources

How Will People Learn to Think Ethically if We Don’t Teach Them?

While we place a heavy emphasis on corporate education and childhood education as a nation, we don’t often see “learning to think ethically” on the classroom agenda or the corporate training schedule. How can people be expected to navigate the complexities of life and work responsibly without learning how to think ethically?

Ethical Thinking Helps us Behave Ethically

The most responsible and ethical response to a situation only becomes obvious by applying ethical thinking.

If you are teaching in a classroom or corporate setting and ethical thinking is not yet on your agenda, review these interesting sources and evaluate their application. See if you agree that ethical thinking needs to be one of the foundations included in childhood and corporate education.

5 Sources for Thinking Ethically

Five Ways to Think Ethically  Video Featuring Kirk O. Hanson, Executive Director, Markkula Center for Applied Ethics, Santa Clara University

The Ethical Mirage: A Temporal Explanation as to Why We Aren’t as Ethical as We Think We Are – a Harvard Business School Working Paper by Tenbrunsel, Diekmann, Wade-Benzoni and Bazerman, hbs.edu

Should We? How to Think Ethically by Mary Ann Cutter Ph.D., University of Colorado

The Importance of Responsible Thinking by Bob Korn, truthpizza.org

Teaching Children to Think Ethically by Susan Gardner, published in Analytical Teaching and Philosophical Praxis, posted online at viterbo.edu

Questions for Reflection

1. Have we made it a priority to help people think ethically about their work?

2. How well are we teaching people the process of thinking ethically?

3. Do our leaders understand that ethical thinking does not just “happen” and that they need to coach people through it?

4. How will ethical thinking help our company in the future, in areas that include risk prevention and customer service?

5. How will we incorporate ethical thinking into our meetings and leadership training programs in 2012?

© 2011 Leading in Context LLC 

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For more, see new book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014 Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses

 

Shared Ethical Values Part 2

Shared Ethical Values Part 2  – A Reader Asked for More!

At the request of a reader via a comment on Linked In (thanks for the suggestion Jan!) this post features more sources and more recent sources of information about shared ethical values on a global scale.

The Names Vary, But it’s All About Ethical Values

While the titles vary, including “corporate social responsibility” or “global business” they are addressing shared values and principles of responsible business in a global economy.

“The Manifesto was drafted by a working group of business leaders and experts in economic ethics, convened by the Global Ethic Foundation. On 6 October 2009, it was presented to the public in a symposium at UN
Headquarters in New York under the joint sponsorship of the UN Global Compact Office, the Swiss Permanent Mission to the United Nations and the Novartis Foundation for Sustainable Development.”

Global Economic Ethic – Consequences for Global Business, Global Ethics Foundation (2009)

“The United Nations Global Compact, also known as Compact or UNGC, is a United Nations initiative to encourage businesses worldwide to adopt sustainable and socially responsible policies, and to report on their implementation. The Global Compact is a principle-based framework for businesses, stating ten principles in the areas of human rightslabour, the environment and anti-corruption. Under the Global Compact, companies are brought together with UN agencies, labour groups and civil society.”

The United Nations Global Compact (2004)   Wikipedia.com

 

 

 

522

For more, see new book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014 Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses
© 2011 Leading in Context LLC 


Top 10 Leading in Context Blog Posts

As of today, after over 100 posts, these are the 

Top 10 Most Popular Leading in Context® Blog Posts:

  1. Planned Obsolescence: Is it Ethical? No. Can We Still Have the Newest Gadgets? Yes!
  2. Case Study: Is Withholding Information From Other Leaders Unethical?
  3. Ethical Interpersonal Behavior Graphic: Red, Yellow and Green Zones
  4. Ethical Leadership Resources. LeadinginContext™.com
  5. Leadership and…Effectiveness: Does Multitasking Work?
  6. Overuse of Antibiotics: Antibiotic Hand Soap is Part of the Problem
  7. Ethical Consumerism 2010: The New “Good” Shopping Experience
  8. 100 Systems Thinking Resources for Leaders
  9. 100 Trends and Predictions 2011
  10. Ethical Thinking: 5 Questions to Ponder for the New Year
Thank you for following the Leading in Context Blog. Please keep in touch and ask for articles that clarify issues in ethical leadership that you want to learn more about.

522

For more, see new book 7 Lenses and the 21 Question Assessment: How Current is My Message About Ethics?

7 Lenses is a Bronze Axiom Business Book Award Winner in Business Ethics41cEVx-Tu4L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
2014 Axiom Business Book Award Winner 
About 7 Lenses
 
 Info@LeadinginContext.com  @leadingincontxt  @7Lenses 
© 2011 Leading in Context LLC 
 
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