The Human Journey

By Linda Fisher Thornton The human journey. We're all taking it, but we don't always know where it's headed. We can't always see where we've been until later, when we have the long-term perspective and can begin to make sense of the twists and turns we've taken throughout our lives.

Seeing Past Our Point of View

By Linda Fisher Thornton Have you noticed the steady increase in the complexity of navigating our daily lives? It feels like we have too many choices, too much information, and not enough time. More information and more choices would be great if we had the time to research and decide, but the reality is that it's difficult and time consuming to sort out which information is reliable and which is not. Seeing and appreciating other ways of doing things is not just a nice-to-have ability. In a connected global society, it's an essential skill. To achieve mutual benefit and collaboration, we will need to see the world from other perspectives that differ from our own, respect those perspectives, and work together toward shared goals. Leaders who don't know how and don't make the effort to change can be thought of as intentionally "unseeing" important aspects of the context and their leadership responsibility.

Different Perspectives (They’re Not a Threat)

By Linda Fisher Thornton Differences of opinion can be inconvenient and uncomfortable. We may be in a discussion with someone who has very different views from ours on a topic of great importance to us. How we handle it shows others the inner workings of our character.

Adaptability is an Ethical Issue

By Linda Fisher Thornton Ego-driven leaders want to be "right" even when the evidence shows otherwise. They see rightness as something fixed that they can control. Of course, it isn't fixed and they can't control it, but they may not want to be confused with the facts. Conversely, when ego is not driving the thinking process, leaders can adapt to changing information and circumstances and change their minds.

Learning Ethical Leadership: Talent Development Implications

By Linda Fisher Thornton Ethical leadership isn't something we can ever say we've fully accomplished. It's not about arriving at any particular place, or about achieving a certain level of knowledge. Just knowing about ethics and leadership won't get us very far in an information-flooded, globally shifting, and unpredictable world where we are under time pressure and held accountable for making ethical choices under ever-more-extreme conditions including the current global pandemic.

How You Can Stop The “Fake News” Madness

By Linda Fisher Thornton

We all need to know how to tell what's real news and what's not. While a headline may be compelling, we can easily damage our personal reputation and brand if we share it and it turns out to be "fake news." 

It's our job to "check stories out" to be sure that what we share is real.

Our "Human Software" is Buggy

While it's important for us to tell the difference between the real and the fake, our "human software" comes with bugs. One type of bug we all have is cognitive biases, and one of our biases causes us to readily believe headlines we already agree with (confirmation bias). 

20 Quotes To Inspire Leaders in the New Year (Part 1)

By Linda Fisher Thornton

In the New Year, we will deal with leadership challenges we cannot predict in advance. To be ready, we need to set our leadership and learning on the path to success.

This series includes 20 quotes (linked to posts with leadership guidance) that will help you leverage your leadership planning. Here are the first 10:

Building Trust: Paradoxical Qualities to Cultivate

By Linda Fisher Thornton

As we progress on the learning journey toward positive leadership, some of the qualities we seek seem to be paradoxical. For example, as leaders we need to be CRYSTAL CLEAR in outwardly communicating what we expect and also OPEN to hearing input from others that might change our plans. We need to be FULLY PRESENT in this moment, and still able to THINK AHEAD to prepare for the future.

Leaders, Don’t You Care? (9 Red Flags That Tell Employees You Don’t)

By Linda Fisher Thornton

One of the hallmark requirements of ethical leadership is that we CARE about people, about their success, and about creating a positive work environment. If leaders fail to demonstrate that they care, that harms the culture.

The 9 behaviors below are red flags for employees - pointing out that a leader doesn't care.

Take Positive Action When You See Unethical Leadership

By Linda Fisher Thornton

While I specialize in positive, proactive ethical leadership, I frequently get asked questions about unethical leadership. In particular, readers ask about the damage that toxic leaders do in organizations and what situations and circumstances lead to ethical failures.

Today I'm sharing posts about unethical leadership that may answer your deep questions about what leadership looks like when it is NOT ethical:

Are You Approachable?

By Linda Fisher Thornton

The pace of change is out of control in the workplace. Have any of you learned more than three new software programs this week? Have you had to deliver on deadline in spite of being completely new to a project? Have you struggled to get the attention of colleagues when you need their input, only to find that they are too busy to make the time to meet?